Preventative measures can help protect against mosquito bites

by Katie Pratt, University of Kentucky

Mosquitoes are appearing earlier than normal this year. University of Kentucky entomologists encourage Kentuckians to take precautions to prevent mosquito bites on themselves and their pets.

“Mosquitoes breed in standing water. The recent rains we have had, coupled with the upcoming warm weather, may help them get off to a strong start,” said Grayson Brown, entomologist in the UK College of Agriculture, Food and Environment. Continue reading

The spread of mosquito borne diseases in the U.S.

Excerpted from Entomology Today

A team of researchers from Brazil and Argentina propose several ideas for the many mosquito-borne disease outbreaks in a paper recently published in the Journal of Medical Entomology. Continue reading

Free Collection of articles on Aedes albopictus [Asian tiger mosquito] – Journal of Medical Entomology – Sept 2016 issue

This collection of scientific papers is particularly timely because of the potential involvement of Aedes albopictus, the Asian tiger mosquito, with Zika virus.

In particular, these 4 may be of general interest to an IPM audience  – Continue reading

Entomological Society provides information on the Asian tiger mosquito

This week is National Mosquito Control Awareness Week, and the Entomological Society of America is supporting the effort with a special collection of articles about the Asian tiger mosquito.

Like its close relative Aedes aegypti, the Asian tiger mosquito (Aedes albopictus) has been in the news recently due to its ability to transmit pathogens that cause diseases such as Zika, dengue, and chikungunya. Unlike Aedes aegypti, which is mainly found in areas where the weather is warm year-round, Aedes albopictus can tolerate colder weather, and in the United States it is found as far north as New York and New Jersey. As its name implies, this invasive insect came to North America from Asia in the 1980s and has since become a well-established pest in many areas.

Read the rest of this post at Entomology Today

Time for Kentuckians to take mosquito protection measures

by Katie Pratt, University of Kentucky

University of Kentucky entomologists have captured Asian tiger mosquitoes in the Central Kentucky area during the past few days and are encouraging Kentuckians to take measures to prevent mosquito bites.

“The Asian tiger mosquito is the most common mosquito in Kentucky. We are seeing it earlier than normal this year,” said Grayson Brown, entomologist with the UK College of Agriculture, Food and Environment. “What’s different this year is this mosquito is implicated as a possible carrier for Zika. Kentuckians who are concerned about Zika should start taking precautions.” Continue reading

Zika website gives Kentuckians latest information

By Katie Pratt

University of Kentucky entomologists recently developed a website that will have the most up-to-date information on the Zika virus and its spread, as mosquito populations around the state begin to build. The website is http://pest.ca.uky.edu/EXT/ZIKA/1kyzika.html.

“Mosquitoes are beginning to appear in the state now, and their populations will peak during the mid- to late summer,” said Lee Townsend, extension entomologist with the UK College of Agriculture, Food and Environment and website administrator. “The website has information on the mosquitoes which are potential virus carriers in Kentucky and will include information on locally transmitted cases as they appear.” Continue reading

How to protect yourself from mosquitoes this summer

In Delta Farm Press

by Randy LaBauve, LSU AgCenter

Summer is not far away, and with it will come swarms of mosquitoes, which bring the threat of West Nile virus, eastern equine encephalitis and the potential for other diseases like Zika virus. That’s why it’s important for people to distinguish fact from fiction when choosing a plan of defense to fight their bites.

“West Nile virus is something we’re going to have to deal with annually,” said Kristen Healy, LSU AgCenter medical entomologist. “So whether or not Zika virus becomes an issue in Louisiana, it’s important to remember that you should always protect yourself from mosquitoes.” Continue reading