MS/PhD assistantship available to work on bermudagrass mite

The turf and ornamentals entomology program at Clemson University is looking for a MS or PhD student to work on a project developing management approaches for bermudagrass mite in turfgrass system. A MS project will evaluate integrated cultural and chemical management approaches against bermudagrass mite, whereas a PhD project will include additional studies  to understand the life cycle and seasonal biology/pest status of bermudagrass mite. Most project activities will be conducted at Pee Dee Research and Education Center (in Florence, SC), and sod farms and golf courses along the coastal plains of SC. Continue reading

Ph.D. Assistantship in Forest Entomology, Pathology, and Ecology

The Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources at the University of Georgia, Athens invites applications from highly motivated and enthusiastic students for a Ph.D. Assistantship starting in Summer/Fall 2018.  This collaborative work will be conducted with Dr. Kamal Gandhi (Warnell School of Forestry) and Dr. Kier Klepzig (Joseph W. Jones Ecological Research Center).  The project focuses on bark beetle (Ips avulsus), tree (longleaf pine), and environment interactions (fire, drought, etc.) as they affect the life-cycle of the beetle and its symbionts (fungi and mites).  The ideal candidate would possess both field and laboratory experience related to entomology, mycology and/ or ecology, a strong statistical background, and an independent spirit to develop, conduct, and publish research.  A MS Degree in a related field, especially in forest entomology, pathology, or ecology is a prerequisite for the position.  As a part of the graduate program, extensive fieldwork in longleaf pine forests in southwestern Georgia will be required.  Continue reading

PhD assistantship: Applied systematics of bark beetles

The Forest Entomology team at the University of Florida (www.sfrc.ufl.edu/emergingthreats and www.ambrosiasymbiosis.org) is looking for a PhD student to work on projects integrating modern beetle systematics with real-world applications. Examples of “applied systematics” projects that the student can choose from include:

  • Assessment of invasion potential of Cuban wood borers (includes work in Cuba)
  • Revision of American ambrosia beetles to incorporate recent invasive species
  • Genetic species limits in morphologically cryptic beetles
  • Analysis of bias in federal and state bark beetle monitoring programs: what are we not catching?
  • Identification of wood borers killing cacao in Belize
  • Various extension and outreach projects.

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