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    The Southern Region IPM Center is located at North Carolina State University, 1730 Varsity Drive, Suite 110, Raleigh, NC 27606, and is sponsored by the United States Department of Agriculture, National Institute of Food and Agriculture.
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School IPM Roundtable meeting creates linkages, resources

by Janet Hurley, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension

On May 25, 2016, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) convened 29 representatives of 17 national school, health and pest management associations and federal government agencies in Washington, DC to discuss ideas for implementing a set of principles promoting the adoption of IPM practices in the nation’s schools. A meeting summary documents the event, captures key discussion and presentation points, and provides links to resources referenced. A blog by EPA Assistant Administrator Jim Jones, Endorsing a Path to Healthier Schools, provides context for the event and highlights its importance to the school community.

The 2016 School IPM Roundtable brought together disparate groups to pursue a voluntary enterprise that addresses pest problems proactively and reduces unnecessary exposure to pesticides.  These organizations provided their endorsement of a Principles of Agreement on school IPM.  They also committed to disseminate the endorsement, along with information on resources available to support school IPM implementation, to their members and associates. The event included an exchange of ideas on how the participants could track implementation of school IPM as a result of the endorsement. Continue reading

Free Webinar: the ABC’s of Pest Control: Allergens, Baits and Cockroaches

Cockroach infestations can get out of hand quickly in multifamily housing. Best practices and treatments can turn things around to help maintain control. Join StopPests in Housing for a webinar on reducing asthma triggers in housing with effective cockroach control. 

On March 2nd, 2017, 2:00-3:30 EST, you’ll hear from Dr. Coby Schal, Ph.D, Department of Entomology, North Carolina State University. He will speak about his research on effective baiting techniques, and ineffective controls like total release foggers (bug bombs). Cockroach allergens have been linked to the development and increase in symptoms of allergies and asthma in cockroach sensitive individuals. You’ll learn how allergen levels can be significantly reduced with cockroach control alone, the most effective approach being gel bait treatments. Dr. Schal’s work shows how an integrated pest management (IPM) approach with intensive, targeted cockroach control can lead to both dramatic reductions in cockroaches and clinically significant declines in cockroach allergens. You’ll get the information you need to advocate for and implement an IPM approach to cockroach control. Continue reading

Boston Children’s Hospital study looks at allergens in schools

In the Daily Mail (UK)

Schools are saturated with bacteria from mice, exacerbating kids’ asthma, a new study warns.

More than one in 10 children suffer from asthma, the leading chronic illness in under-18s – and that figure is rapidly escalating.  Continue reading

What You Can Do To Prevent Asthma

by Joe Hubbard and Jennah Durant, Environmental Protection Agency

It’s hard to see a child sick. The good news is you can help a child gain control over asthma. That means fewer days out of school and fewer attacks that can be scary for you and the child.

May is Asthma Awareness Month, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is joining other public and private agencies across the United States in fighting asthma—a growing epidemic. Continue reading

“The ABC’s of Pest Control: Allergens, Baits, and Cockroaches” Dr. Coby Schal to present May 10th

From StopPests IPM in MultiFamily Housing blog

The US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) is hosting a webcast on asthma triggers in housing, sponsored by their Office of Lead Hazard Control and Healthy Homes. Hear from Coby Schal, Ph.D, Blanton J. Whitmire, Distinguished Professor, Department of Entomology, North Carolina State University on May 10th, 2016, 1:00-2:00pm EDT. Visit this website to register. Once registered, you will receive an email with a link to the webcast. Note: The link to the webcast will not be visible until the day of the webcast.The event will be recorded and you will have an opportunity to view the recording if you can’t make it to the live event.   Continue reading

EPA Celebrates Programs, Tools to Prevent Asthma Attacks

May is Asthma Awareness Month, when the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) spotlights ways people can take simple steps to help prevent asthma attacks. EPA also honors local asthma management programs for their leadership in improving the lives of people living with asthma, especially those in underserved communities.

“Asthma is fundamentally connected to the health of our environment – whether it’s the air outside, or in our homes,” said Administrator Gina McCarthy.  “By working together across the environmental, housing, social, and medical sectors, we can do even more to raise awareness about this critical public health issue and protect those who are most vulnerable, including the more than 6 million children in the U.S. with asthma.” Continue reading

Penn State and Philadelphia schools fight pests that trigger asthma

Asthma is a chronic lung disease affecting ten percent of school-aged children in the United States. In Philadelphia, this number jumps to almost 25 percent, and in some neighborhoods, nearly 50 percent of school-aged children have been diagnosed. The Pennsylvania Integrated Pest Management (PA IPM) program — a collaboration between the College of Agricultural Sciences at Penn State and the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture — is partnering with the School District of Philadelphia (SDP) to reduce asthma triggers in schoolchildren by preventing pests, including mice and cockroaches, from entering schools.

“Asthma can limit physical activity, and is the number one reason for school absenteeism Nationwide,” said Michelle Niedermeier, community IPM coordinator for PA IPM. “While asthma cannot be cured, it can be controlled with medication and by avoiding common triggers such as tobacco smoke, mold, cockroaches, and mice. School buildings that can be easily penetrated by mice and other pests might be a contributing factor to this high incidence of asthma.” Continue reading

Helping Residents Breathe Easier by Addressing Asthma Triggers in Housing

You are invited to access a webcast, “Helping Residents Breathe Easier by Addressing Asthma Triggers in Housing.”

This webcast is sponsored by HUD’s Office of Lead Hazard Control and Healthy Homes.

When: April 5, 2016 from 1:00 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. Continue reading

Attention All School-based Asthma Programs!

Start your application now for the 2015 U.S. EPA National Environmental Leadership Award in Asthma Management! Since 2005, 32 health plans, healthcare providers and communities in action have received this Award – the nation’s highest honor for programs delivering excellent environmental asthma management as part of their comprehensive asthma care services.

Deadline: January 30, 2015, 11:59 p.m. EST

Continue reading

Pesticide regulations in United States schools

When used properly, pesticides can be valuable tools that reduce risks from pests. However, in schools and childcare settings, pesticides should be used with greater care to reduce risks to children. Many U.S. states have encouraged this care by passing laws governing pesticide use in schools. An article in the summer 2014 issue of American Entomologist takes a closer look at these laws in various states and makes several recommendations for safety regulations for schools in general.

Continue reading