Tune in February 27 to learn how to manage target spot

In a webinar on Monday, February 27, at 3 PM Eastern, Austin Hagan, professor and extension plant pathologist at Auburn University, will discuss ways to recognize target spot in your field as well as management techniques to lower the risk.

Target spot, which is caused by the fungus Corynespora cassiicola, is an emerging disease in cotton in the Lower and Mid-South in the U.S. Phylogenetically, C. cassiicola isolates collected from cotton across the Lower South are distinct from those collected from other crops, particularly vegetables. This suggests that C. cassiicola isolates from cotton are either a recent introduction to the U.S. or has arisen from a mutation. Rainfall patterns along with variety selection and management inputs relating to yield potential influence the target spot risk in cotton. Greatest target spot-attributed defoliation and subsequent yield losses, which may exceed 300 pounds of lint per acre, have been recorded for an intensively managed, susceptible variety having a yield potential above 2.5 to 3 bales per acre. Continue reading

Webinar: Managing target spot in cotton: results of a USDA NIFA-funded study

Target spot, which is caused by the fungus Corynespora cassiicola, is an emerging disease in cotton in the Lower and Mid-South in the U.S. Phylogenetically, C. cassiicola isolates collected from cotton across the Lower South are distinct from those collected from other crops, particularly vegetables. This suggests that C. cassiicola isolates from cotton are either a recent introduction to the U.S. or has arisen from a mutation. Rainfall patterns along with variety selection and management inputs relating to yield potential influence the target spot risk in cotton. Greatest target spot-attributed defoliation and subsequent yield losses, which may exceed 300 pounds of lint per acre, have been recorded for an intensively managed, susceptible variety having a yield potential above 2.5 to 3 bales per acre.

Dr. Austin Hagan of Auburn University will discuss the results of a two-year study on developing integrated strategies for managing target spot in cotton. Topics that will be addressed in the webinar will include disease distribution, variety susceptibility and potential yield loss, efficacy of registered and candidate fungicides, fungicide application number, timing, methodology, and placement, as well as the influence of cotton cropping frequency, tillage practices, seeding rate, and planting date on disease development and cotton yield. Continue reading

Research ongoing for target spot disease

Auburn University researcher Austin Hagan explains that researchers are finding options to deal with target spot, which will be helpful for cotton growers in south Alabama, where disease pressure is highest. Southeast Farm Press discusses some of his findings, which he explains during a field day in Headland, AL.

Many questions remain about how to treat target spot on cotton, but researchers do know that under the right conditions, it can lead to significant yield losses.

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Tennessee plant pathologist not sounding alarms on target spot yet

Original article and video in Southeast Farm Press

BLOGGER’S NOTE: The Southern IPM Center funded some of Dr. Hagan’s research on target spot, which has helped inform Dr. Kelly’s observations about the disease.

Begin article:

Heather Kelly says she doesn’t want to sound too many alarms about target spot in cotton just yet.

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Thrips pressure high but disease pressure low in Southern peanuts

From Southeast Farm Press

Many peanut growers in the Southeast saw early season conditions this year that mirrored those seen in 2013—a cool, wet spring and heavy thrips pressure.

It was reported at this year’s U.S.A. Peanut Congress that while the peanut crop finally got off to a good start in 2014 after early weather delays, thrips pressure was greater than normal and damage was reported in many locations.

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Planting date impacts peanut disease pressure

In Southeast Farm Press

A cooler, rain-soaked spring in parts of the Southeast pushed peanut planting dates later than usual, a factor that can impact the type and incidence of disease growers experience throughout the remainder of the season.

“Planting dates definitely make a difference in peanut diseases, both in the type of disease you have and the pressure,” says Austin Hagan, Auburn University Extension plant pathologist.

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SIPMC Funds 11 IPM Enhancement Grants this year

Home gardeners, farmers and others will have new tools and educational opportunities thanks to 11 projects recently funded by the Southern IPM Center. Out of a total of 20 proposals, these 11 projects, totaling $300,000 in funding, will provide new crop profiles on turfgrass, ornamentals and agricultural crops; delve into complex pest issues with avocadoes, sorghum and other crops; and provide information for home gardeners on how to use IPM in small vegetable gardens.

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