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    The Southern Region IPM Center is located at North Carolina State University, 1730 Varsity Drive, Suite 110, Raleigh, NC 27606, and is sponsored by the United States Department of Agriculture, National Institute of Food and Agriculture.
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Kudzu bugs: Don’t freak out and spray too soon

In Delta Farm Press

Like the boll weevil in the late 19th century, the kudzu bug has found a home in the U.S., quickly spreading across much of the South, and with few natural enemies, entomologists say it’s likely to be around a long time.

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Soybean growers might as well get acquainted with the kudzu bug

In Southeast Farm Press

By Xing Ping Hu, Alabama Extension Entomologist

What is a kudzu bug?

The kudzu bug is a small yellowish green lady-beetle-like insect. However, they are not a beetle, but a true stink bug with sucking mouths that sip the juice from plants.

They like to aggregate in clusters and release a very strong, foul odor that you can smell several feet away.

Kudzu bugs are also called lablab bugs, bean bugs, globular stink bugs, and bean plataspids.

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North Carolina kudzu bug treatment thresholds evolving

By Dominic Reisig, North Carolina Extension Entomologist, In Southeast Farm Press

Kudzu bug activity has heightened with the warm weather in the past two weeks.

Adults are flying from over-wintering sites and searching for their reproductive hosts, wisteria, kudzu and soybeans.

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Controlling kudzu bugs can boost soybean yields

By Southeast Farm Press

Georgia soybean producers made a record crop this past year with 37 bushels per acre, but yields might be improved even more by controlling insect pests like the relatively new kudzu bug.

This pest was first observed in the United States in the fall of 2009, in northeast Georgia,” says Phillip Roberts, University of Georgia Extension entomologist.

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Soybean-damaging kudzu bug inching closer to Arkansas

From Delta Farm Press

The kudzu bug, an insect that has caused up to 20 percent yield losses in some untreated soybean fields in North Carolina, is inching its way nearer to Arkansas.

Native to India and China the pest was first found in the United States in 2009. It’s a tiny insect — just one-sixth to one-quarter of an inch long and is olive green with brown speckles. They waddle when they walk, but are excellent fliers.

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New pest in South has a new website

If you’re a resident of Georgia, or anywhere in the surrounding area, you’ve probably heard or read news in the last couple of years about a new invasive pest that is “bugging” both farmers and homeowners alike. It’s Megacopta cribraria, or the kudzu bug. Continue reading

Kudzu bug found in Mississippi

Established kudzu bug populations have been confirmed in southern Mississippi. This finding represents a significant jump in the range of this pest across the whole state of Mississippi from previously confirmed sites in Alabama. The Warren County, Mississippi location is also one county south of point where the state boundaries of Mississippi, Arkansas and Louisiana converge.

Read the Delta Farm press story on the finding.