Study finds rotating with corn boosts cotton yields

In Delta Farm Press

Cotton following corn in rotation resulted in an average 8.9 percent to 17.1 percent yield increase compared to continuous cotton in a 12-year study at Mississippi State University.

Wayne Ebelhar, MSU research professor and agronomist, discussed the long-term research project at the recent Beltwide Cotton Conferences in San Antonio. The study was conducted on two sites, the Centennial Farm at Stoneville, Miss., where cotton has been grown continuously “for at least 100 years,” Ebelhar says, and the Tribbett farm, which is not as productive as the Stoneville location. Ebelhar says the yield advantage comes from “the rotation effect. All other factors were the same.” Continue reading

Land-grant university scientists looking into neonicotinoid effects on pollinators

In Delta Farm Press

Neonicotinoid seed treatments are clearly in the crosshairs of environmental activists as the debate over bee health issues continues unabated. Rather than resorting to unsubstantiated claims and rhetoric, however, researchers and Extension entomologists in the Mid-South are conducting exhaustive studies about the impact of the insecticides on pollinators. The University of Tennessee’s Scott Stewart reported on those efforts at the Beltwide Cotton Conferences in San Antonio.

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Herbicides: Time of day you spray can make a difference

From Southeast Farm Press

What if a cotton producer needed to spray early in the morning or late in the afternoon or at night? Does the time of day a herbicide is applied make a difference in how well it works? A group of weed specialists studied this and what they found surprised them.

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Heavy rye cover keeps down and smothers resistant Palmer amaranth

In Southeast Farm Press

Glyphosate-resistant Palmer amaranth pigweed confounds growers and researchers alike with its persistence and vigor, but progress is being made in finding ways to economically suppress this yield-robbing pest in cotton.

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Loss of seed treatments could increase use of insecticides

From Delta Farm Press

Environmental groups appear to be setting their sights on the neonicotinoid class of insecticides and other pesticide compounds as the main culprits in honey bee population declines.

The evidence the insecticides are the main cause is sketchy, and the loss of those would put many farmers in an unprofitable situation, according to Jeff Gore, research entomologist at Mississippi State University’s Delta Research and Extension Center.

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Georgia extension specialists give tentative recommendations on target spot

From Southeast Farm Press

“Between a rock and a hard spot.”

That’s where many Extension agents and consultants feel they’re stuck as far as target spot on cotton in Georgia.

“As Extension specialists, agents and consultants, this is really where we are,” said University of Georgia Extension plant pathologist Bob Kemerait, speaking at the recent Beltwide Cotton Conferences in New Orleans.

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Pollinator issues subject of presentation at Beltwide

In Delta Farm Press

Declines in honey bee populations continue to attract attention in the national media and in environmental activist circles. Activists and some beekeepers have been asking that pesticide registrations be withdrawn because of claims the chemicals are impacting bees negatively.

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