Extension demo plot shows most economic management tool during heavy fall armyworm year

In Delta Farm Press

by Mary Hightower, University of Arkansas

Fall armyworms don’t bother with calendars. They’re here, they’re hungry and – never mind that it’s mid-summer — they’re in their second generation.

However, they can be managed, and that’s what Kelly Loftin, Extension entomologist, and Hank Chaney, regional agricultural and natural resources specialist, have been working with Steven Stone, Lincoln County Extension staff chair, all with the University of Arkansas System Division of Agriculture, have been eager to show in a pasture outside of Star City in southeastern Arkansas. Continue reading

Flood recovery management for pastures

by Dr. Matt Poore, NC State University Animal Science

We have a lot of questions recently about pasture renovation due to damage caused last year by the drought in the western and central North Carolina and the flood in eastern North Carolina. The drought caused stand damage on many farms across the western region, and also in the east on pastures that stayed under water for ore than a week.   As the weather warms up you should be able to tell which fields have severe long-term damage, which are weakened, and which are in good shape. As you assess your pastures, keep in mind that you really need to be thinking in terms of how much bare ground there is, how much of the cover is desirable forage species, how much is undesirable species (weeds), and whether legumes are present. Your local advisors including your extension agents and conservationists have training on assessing pasture condition, so make sure you seek their guidance as you approach your pasture evaluation. Continue reading

Spooky new fungal disease on southern golf courses unmasked

by Kathleen Phillips, Texas A&M AgriLife

A turfgrass disease that looked like an ink spill on many southern golf courses has been identified and all but blotted out, according to a plant pathologist with the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service.

The disease, which occurs on short-cut Bermuda and Zoysia grasses, had golf course superintendents from Texas to Florida “scared,” Dr. Young-Ki Jo said, because it ruined the aesthetic looks of their fairways and greens, which could have some players teed-off. Continue reading

Do you have circular dead patches in your lawn?

In the University of Georgia Landscape Alert blog

This blog is adapted from the original by Alfredo Martinez, UGA Plant Pathologist and Willie Chance, UGA Center for Urban Agriculture

This year did your lawns show round or irregular dead or dying patches? Did the grass yellow or wilt even though the soil is moist? If so, these lawns may be infected with Take All root rot. This fungal disease affects cen­tipede, St. Augustine and Bermuda lawns.

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UK researchers studying environmental impacts of lawns

Many homeowners love the sight of a pristine, green lawn, but that beautiful, meticulously kept lawn may come at a cost to the environment. University of Kentucky scientists are conducting research to find the answer.

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Armyworms are chomping through Mississippi crops

In Delta Farm Press

Armywormageddon: That’s the term Angus Catchot has coined this year for what he says is “by far been the biggest armyworm invasion we’ve ever seen in the Mid-South.”

And the worm influx isn’t crop specific, he said at the joint annual meeting of the Mississippi Boll Weevil Management Corporation and the Mississippi Farm Bureau Federation Cotton Policy Committee.

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Bermudagrass stem maggots on the move across Florida pastures

In Southeast Farm Press

By Liza Garcia-Jimenez, University of Florida

The first high populations of Bermudagrass stem maggot are now occurring in Central Florida and likely will be seen in North Florida any day now, if not already.

The adult stage of this pest are small flies.  The flies lay eggs in Bermudagrass fields of all types.  The maggots or larva hatch and burrow in the top node of the plant and feed, eventually killing the top leaf shoot.  Loss of both quality and quantity of Bermudagrass hay results. Producers should be on the lookout for BSM populations, signs of which are manifested by a brown coloring to the field that should be green.

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