“The IPM Toolbox” Webinar Recordings Are Available

The Northeastern IPM Center recently hosted two webinars in its “IPM Toolbox” series. Watch the recordings online, and be sure to check out our next webinar about the brown marmorated stink bug on Monday, September 25, 2017. Continue reading

USDA scientist discovers nature-based pesticide that kills SWD

In USDA ARS news

A scent that petunias and snapdragons release to attract pollinators may be an environmentally friendly control for pests like the spotted wing drosophila fly (SWD) and the brown marmorated stink bug.

Agricultural Research Service (ARS) chemist Aijun Zhang discovered the fragrant chemical methyl benzoate, which is also a popular ingredient approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for use in foods, cosmetics and shampoo, can kill these insects and others. Continue reading

Join the National March Madness Citizen Science Project to find the BMSB

University and USDA Entomologists are teaming up to map the location and population density of a newly invasive insect, the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB), Halyomorpha halys. You can help us track and the insect in urban environments by joining the project to put BMSB on the map.

  • Representative elementary and middle schools in each of the 48 States are receiving this invitation to participate in the

 ‘March Madness Citizen Science Project to Find Stinky’ .

  • Students and parents interested in participating in the project will begin
    by taking an image of your BMSB.  Then send your image to EDDMaps
    . Once confirmed, report your findings daily.
  • Follow the guidelines on the BMSB Project website to get started.

Let the March Madness Citizen Science Project Begin! Continue reading

New specialty crop project promises new, sustainable tools for BMSB fight

Specialty crop growers throughout the country will benefit from a new $3.7 million USDA grant won by NC State to find sustainable control options for the invasive brown marmorated stink bug (BMSB).

Now that BMSB is detected in 43 states and is adapting to new climates, more needs to be done to manage the pest from a national perspective, says NC State Extension Entomologist Jim Walgenbach, principle investigator in the project. The grant is sponsored by USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) Specialty Crops Research Initiative Program, and includes the cooperation of scientists from 16 land grant universities across the country as well as the USDA-ARS. Continue reading

Scientists gather, share updates on spread of stink bugs

At StopBMSB.org

by Chris Gonzales, Northeastern IPM Center

The Brown Marmorated Stink Bug Working Group Meeting was organized as a conference with presentations—however, as a working group, scientists frequently conversed and discussed topics during and after updates. Below, we give highlights and summaries of the presentations.

About thirty scientists gathered recently in New Brunswick, New Jersey, in a meeting sponsored by the Northeastern IPM Center, and discussed the persistent, steady spread of the brown marmorated stink bug (BMSB). Continue reading

Tree of Heaven, paulownia are two tree species that provide refuge for brown marmorated stink bug after hibernation, study finds

Since its discovery in the United States in 1996, the brown marmorated stink bug has been testing the patience of farmers and homeowners alike. From spring to fall it decimates crops such as tree fruits, vegetables, cotton, corn and soybeans. After harvest it retreats to residential areas, covering buildings and vehicles, and often entering people’s homes.

The brown marmorated stink bug, or BMSB as it’s often called, was detected for the first time in Allentown, Pennsylvania in 1996. Over the next ten years, it spread to several states in the Northeast and began migrating south. By 2010 the pest was in North Carolina, and has since become a serious pest of fruit trees and vegetables. In some areas BMSB populations are so numerous that they are very difficult to control and inflict high levels of damage.

Continue reading

BMSB treatments are causing secondary flare-ups of San Jose scale

Insecticides used to treat brown marmorated stink bug are depleting predatory insects that control San Jose scale, say Pennsylvania State University extension specialists. San Jose scale is easy to prevent, and prevention is preferable to trying to treat it once it starts. It is also a dangerous pest to leave uncontrolled, as it can kill a tree in a season or two.

Read more at the PSU extension page on San Jose scale.