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Texas A&M scientists synthesize historical tick models to help curb the pest globally

by Steve Byrnes, Texas A&M AgriLife

The battle against fever ticks rages on, and a group of Texas A&M University and French National Institute for Agricultural Research scientists are doing their best to determine where the fray will head by synthesizing historical models for use in curbing the pest globally.

Texas A&M’s departments of wildlife and fisheries sciences and entomology and the French institute have collaborated for a number of years to model systems approaches meant to address ecological and regulatory questions about fever ticks, said Dr. Pete Teel, who works within the entomology department’s Tick Research Laboratory. Continue reading

Texas cattle fever ticks are back with a vengeance

by Steve Byrnes, Texas A&M AgriLife

Texas cattle fever ticks, which made Texas longhorns the pariah of the plains in the late 1800s, are once again expanding their range with infestations detected in Live Oak, Willacy and Kleberg counties, said Texas A&M AgriLife experts.  

As of Feb. 1, more than 500,000 acres in Texas are under various quarantines outside of the permanent quarantine zone. Continue reading

USDA APHIS assessment attempts to reduce population of cattle fever ticks

In Southwest Farm Press

by Logan Hawkes

According to a revised and re-issued environmental assessment last week, failure to take action to reduce the population of free ranging and tick-infected Nilgai antelope near the mouth of the Lower Rio Grande River in deep South Texas would likely open the door to re-infestation of cattle fever ticks into other and adjacent parts of lower Texas. Consequences to the state’s vibrant cattle industry could be dire.

Continue reading