Pecan entomologist Angelita Acebes joins the UGA Tifton campus

By Clint Thompson, Julie Jernigan, University of Georgia

New University of Georgia Cooperative Extension pecan entomologist Angelita Acebes hopes to find more effective, sustainable solutions for Georgia farmers managing pest insects.

Since March 1, when she started her new position on the UGA Tifton campus, Acebes has identified the most pressing pest problems for pecan growers, including black and yellow pecan aphids, hickory shuckworms, pecan weevils and ambrosia beetles. Continue reading

Tips for managing spring Insect pests

posted in the IPM Communicator by Ann Chambliss, Alabama Cooperative Extension Service

There are thousands of insects in residential ecosystems, most of which emerge in response to the weather, temperature in particular. Spring weather conditions can change considerably from year to year, so can the time to take action against a certain insect. For centuries, people have used plant phenology (blooms, leaf flush) as nature’s signs to set up wasp traps and mend window screens to fend off house flies. Phenology uses the correlation of recurring seasonal plant and insect life cycle stages, rather than calendar date, to predict the activity of pests.

Though the exact dates of emergence of the same species may vary from year to year, pest emergence around homes in Alabama occurs in a very similar order every year. The temperature-dependent biology of insects makes them better in tune with an ever changing climate, than the calendar. Continue reading

Let the March Madness BMSB Citizen Science Project Begin!

Project Description: Land grant university and USDA Entomologists are teaming up to determine the location and population density of a newly invasive insect, the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug, Halyomorpha halys (BMSB) in the United States. ‘Updated map of BMSB in the US’

Representative elementary schools in each of the 48 continental United States are receiving this invitation to participate in the ‘March Madness Citizen Science Project to ‘Find Stinky the BMSB’. Continue reading

The IPM Toolbox fall webinar series

Got an IPM question? Need to know the latest IPM information? The Northeastern IPM Center has the answers with their Fall webinar series “The IPM Toolbox.” Experts will be online for an hour of dialogue about an effective IPM practice, method, or effort.

They have three webinars scheduled next month… Continue reading

Join the National March Madness Citizen Science Project to find the BMSB

University and USDA Entomologists are teaming up to map the location and population density of a newly invasive insect, the Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB), Halyomorpha halys. You can help us track and the insect in urban environments by joining the project to put BMSB on the map.

  • Representative elementary and middle schools in each of the 48 States are receiving this invitation to participate in the

 ‘March Madness Citizen Science Project to Find Stinky’ .

  • Students and parents interested in participating in the project will begin
    by taking an image of your BMSB.  Then send your image to EDDMaps
    . Once confirmed, report your findings daily.
  • Follow the guidelines on the BMSB Project website to get started.

Let the March Madness Citizen Science Project Begin! Continue reading

New specialty crop project promises new, sustainable tools for BMSB fight

Specialty crop growers throughout the country will benefit from a new $3.7 million USDA grant won by NC State to find sustainable control options for the invasive brown marmorated stink bug (BMSB).

Now that BMSB is detected in 43 states and is adapting to new climates, more needs to be done to manage the pest from a national perspective, says NC State Extension Entomologist Jim Walgenbach, principle investigator in the project. The grant is sponsored by USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) Specialty Crops Research Initiative Program, and includes the cooperation of scientists from 16 land grant universities across the country as well as the USDA-ARS. Continue reading

Scientists gather, share updates on spread of stink bugs

At StopBMSB.org

by Chris Gonzales, Northeastern IPM Center

The Brown Marmorated Stink Bug Working Group Meeting was organized as a conference with presentations—however, as a working group, scientists frequently conversed and discussed topics during and after updates. Below, we give highlights and summaries of the presentations.

About thirty scientists gathered recently in New Brunswick, New Jersey, in a meeting sponsored by the Northeastern IPM Center, and discussed the persistent, steady spread of the brown marmorated stink bug (BMSB). Continue reading

Nine project leaders will advance IPM in nursery crops, tomato and other settings

This year, researchers will find more sustainable ways to grow southern pea, experiment with interseeding cover crops with cash crops to control glyphosate-resistant weeds, and explore ways to support nursery production and other agricultural production. Nine research and extension specialists will lead projects over the next year with funding from IPM Enhancement grants. Continue reading

Plant pest, disease detection program slated for Feb. 6 in Austin

The Travis County Master Gardeners will present a program for detecting insects and diseases that may harm gardens and landscapes.

“The idea behind this program is to help gardeners improve their observation skills toward detecting invasive pests and diseases such as the brown marmorated stink bug and rose rosette,” said Daphne Richards, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service horticulturist for Travis County. Continue reading

Tree of Heaven, paulownia are two tree species that provide refuge for brown marmorated stink bug after hibernation, study finds

Since its discovery in the United States in 1996, the brown marmorated stink bug has been testing the patience of farmers and homeowners alike. From spring to fall it decimates crops such as tree fruits, vegetables, cotton, corn and soybeans. After harvest it retreats to residential areas, covering buildings and vehicles, and often entering people’s homes.

The brown marmorated stink bug, or BMSB as it’s often called, was detected for the first time in Allentown, Pennsylvania in 1996. Over the next ten years, it spread to several states in the Northeast and began migrating south. By 2010 the pest was in North Carolina, and has since become a serious pest of fruit trees and vegetables. In some areas BMSB populations are so numerous that they are very difficult to control and inflict high levels of damage.

Continue reading