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  • Southern IPM blog posts

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  • Funded by USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture

    The Southern Region IPM Center is located at North Carolina State University, 1730 Varsity Drive, Suite 110, Raleigh, NC 27606, and is sponsored by the United States Department of Agriculture, National Institute of Food and Agriculture.
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Balsam woolly adelgid: the smallest and biggest reason to reconsider the importance of subalpine fir

Forest Service staff have noted widespread and rapid subalpine fir mortality across forests in ID and UT. The non-native, invasive balsam woolly adelgid (BWA), Adelges piceae Ratzburg, was confirmed as the primary insect responsible for large areas of subalpine fir mortality in Utah on September 6, 2017. This webinar will provide background on the current status of the true fir host type in Utah and beyond. Webinar content will explain biology, ecology and movement of BWA and how this insect kills trees. We will also discuss practical skills for field identification and current management options. Drawing on our current collaborative efforts, the webinar will close with a question answer session hosted by several entomologists. Continue reading

Oh Christmas Tree, Oh Christmas Tree! How important is IPM for your branches!

You don’t have to travel very far—indeed you just need to go as far as your neighborhood “big box” or grocery story—to find a healthy offering of Christmas trees. In the Southern US, Fraser firs are among the favorite. In fact, Frasers are one of the favorites of White House residents, as it has graced the Blue Room more than any other tree since the 1960s. The Internet is lush with information about how to size a tree for the space it will occupy and how to care for the tree once you’ve gotten it home. I’m going to focus on a topic that few people want to think out—pests and diseases that can affect Christmas trees.

Continue reading