Pros and Cons of Cover Cropping for No-till Vegetable Production: Making sense of current research and past experiences

No-till vegetable production offers a more sustainable approach to weed management than the frequent use of herbicides and tillage, and also promotes soil health. Because cover crop based no-till vegetable production involves a different approach to management, growers may be reluctant to transition from conventional tillage without seeing the system in action and knowing its costs and benefits compared with conventional tillage. In this workshop Clemson University specialists will discuss the pros and cons of cover cropping and no-till with recommendations based on current research and our experiences in the field over the past decade.

May 17TH, 2018, 8:45 AM – 3:30 PM Continue reading

Professor and Department Chair – Clemson University

Clemson University (CU) is seeking to fill a Professor and Department Chair position within their Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences. The Chair provides vision and leadership to facilitate and strengthen our teaching, research, and extension missions. The person selected will promote and guide new initiatives in a large and diverse department. The position is located on the Clemson campus and will be a twelve-month, tenured appointment. Continue reading

New spray guide helps watermelon producers with fungicide decisions

In Southeast Farm Press

South Carolina watermelon producers now have information they need to make their 2017 crops more profitable with the release of the updated Watermelon Spray Guide for 2017, which includes updated recommendations for battling blight.

Released by the Clemson University Cooperative Extension Service, this guide provides growers with a look at some major diseases of watermelon leaves in the southeastern United States as well as a step-by-step guide to spraying. Continue reading

6th Annual South Carolina Organic Growing Conference: Cultivate

This year’s Cultivate conference will take place on March 4 from 8 AM to 4 PM at the Greenville Technical College NW Campus in South Carolina.

REGISTER HERE

Highlights include:

  • Buz Kloot’s 2-class soil series (Soils: why we have to start here and Soil Health and why we think it’s turning traditional soil fertility on its head)
  • Michael Lalich’s (Low Country Labor Finders) presentation on H2A visas and the impending agricultural labor shortage
  • Building Roof Trusses with Jay Pearson and Joshua Snyder, Greenville Technical College
  • Basic Tractor Maintenance
  • Cory Mosser’s (Natural Born Tillers) Avoid Mistakes – 25 things that I did starting out that you shouldn’t!
  • Tradd Cotter’s (Mushroom Mountain) The business of mushrooms

Continue reading

Fungus on tall fescue may cause losses in livestock

in Southeast Farm Press

Tall fescue is a popular grass used for grazing, hay and erosion control in the eastern United States, but one Clemson University expert believes this grass could be responsible for more than $1 billion per year in livestock production losses.

Tall fescue is a perennial bunch-type grass that grows rapidly during spring and fall. The majority of tall fescue plants contain a fungus that creates compounds which are beneficial to the plants, but toxic to livestock. The compounds created by the fungus are called “ergot alkaloids.” Susan Duckett, a professor of animal and veterinary sciences, and some of her students are conducting a study on the impact of these compounds on fetal development and postnatal growth of livestock that graze on tall fescue. Continue reading

Annual Open Forum on Sustainable Agriculture

Sponsored by the South Carolina Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education program.

You’re invited to the annual Open Forum on Sustainable Agriculture to discuss critical issues, challenges and needs related to Sustainable Agriculture development in South Carolina. The meeting is open to all South Carolina farmers, educators, policy makers, state and federal government and non-governmental agricultural agency personnel, and other South Carolina citizens with an interest in sustainable agriculture. Input from this public meeting will be used to prioritize critical issues and needs and to formulate plans for statewide sustainable agriculture training and education programs in 2017.
 
The Open Forum meeting will be held on the 2nd of December, 2016 at the Lake House at Sandhill Research and Education Center on Clemson Rd. in Columbia, SC. Continue reading

Basics of Construction and Crop Production for High Tunnels

High Tunnels allow growers to extend the growing season and increase profitability.  If you are interested in learning more about building high tunnels and using them in crop production, please join Clemson University for a more in depth look at the opportunities high tunnels can provide.

In the afternoon on October 25th we will tour working high tunnels at the Clemson Coastal Research and Education Center and see over 20 varieties of plants currently in production there.  Clemson Extension agent Zack Snipes will be on hand to lead the tour and answer questions.  Continue reading