Annual Open Forum on Sustainable Agriculture

You’re invited to the annual Open Forum on Sustainable Agriculture to discuss critical issues, challenges and needs related to Sustainable Agriculture development in South Carolina. The meeting is open to all South Carolina farmers, educators, policy makers, state and federal government and non-governmental agricultural agency personnel, and other South Carolina citizens with an interest in sustainable agriculture. Input from this public meeting will be used to prioritize critical issues and needs and to formulate plans for statewide sustainable agriculture training and education programs in 2018.
 
The Open Forum meeting will be held on the 30th of November, 2017 at the Kingston Plantation Embassy Suites Resort in Myrtle Beach, SC. The Myrtle Beach location was chosen this year to facilitate participation by many of our stakeholders who also plan to attend the Southeast Vegetable and Fruit Expo being held from November 27th -29th and  the South Carolina Farm Bureau (SCFB) Annual Meeting from November 30th – Dec. 2nd at the same location.

Date: Thursday, November 30th 2017

Time: 9:30 – 12:30 PM

Place: Embassy Suites at Kingston Plantation
~ PEMBROKE ROOM ~ 9800 Queensway Blvd., Myrtle Beach, SC 29572

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Understanding, Building, & Maintaining Soil Health – workshop

Description:

This workshop for farmers and home gardeners will cover the basics of soil health, including SC Soils 101, soil sampling techniques, interpreting soil test results, and using cover crops to improve soil health in both home gardens and commercial vegetable operations. We will also tour City Roots Farm and learn about their soil building practices.

Thursday, June 1st
9AM – 2:30PM
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Clemson students studying ways to improve value of cover crops

In Southeast Farm Press

by Denise Attaway

A group of Clemson students is determining how to use shredded leaves to help increase the value of roller-crimped cover crops.

Cover crops are crops planted primarily to naturally manage soil erosion, soil fertility, soil and water quality, weeds, pests, diseases, biodiversity and wildlife. Roller-crimping involves attaching roller-crimpers to tractors, rolling over cover crops to flatten and damage them, leaving behind a thick mulch. Rye grass is the cover crop used in this study. Continue reading

Wildlife Management Workshop in South Carolina

Calhoun County Extension Office with support from South Carolina Farm Bureau is sponsoring a Wildlife Management Workshop on March 28th beginning at 8:30 AM at the Tri-County Electric Co-op, 6473 Old State Road, St. Matthews SC 29135. (Approved for 6.5 hours SAF Cat. 1 CFE hours for foresters and 1 hour pesticide applicator credit for category 5.)

Topic: Farm Pond, Feral Hog, Quail, Coyote, and Beaver Management

Date: March 28th

Time: 8:30 AM – 5:00 PM Continue reading

Managing Cucurbit Diseases & Insect Pests in Organic Production Systems

This one-day course will focus on field diagnosis of key diseases and insect pests affecting cucurbit crops in organic production systems in South Carolina. Participants will learn about techniques for sampling and identification of key diseases and their symptoms, and for insect pests and their natural enemies. Participants will gain experience in the field monitoring disease and insect pests at the Clemson Organic Farm and will practice disease and insect identification using stereo microscopes and hand lenses in a lab setting. All participants will receive a hand lens to take home. Lunch will be provided, and there will be ample time for questions and discussion about disease and insect problems and solutions. Continue reading

New invasive aphid identified in South Carolina

by Scott Miller, Clemson University

A rare, invasive aphid has been found attacking wheat crops in Hampton County.

This is the first documented case of the Sipha maydis aphid in South Carolina, said Francis Reay-Jones, an entomologist at the Clemson University Pee Dee Research and Education Center in Florence. Continue reading

Clemson smartphone apps help growers fight fruit crop pests

by Scott Miller, Clemson University

Fruit growers can now fight insects and disease from the palms of their hands with technology developed at Clemson University.

Initially tailored for peach and strawberry growers in the Southeast, the MyIPM smartphone app series created by Clemson plant pathologists Guido Schnabel and Mengjun Hu with Clemson computer scientists Greg Edison and Roy Pargas has been expanded through a collaboration with scientists from Cornell University, the University of Massachusetts, Penn State University, North Carolina State University and the University of Georgia. Continue reading