Research ongoing for target spot disease

Auburn University researcher Austin Hagan explains that researchers are finding options to deal with target spot, which will be helpful for cotton growers in south Alabama, where disease pressure is highest. Southeast Farm Press discusses some of his findings, which he explains during a field day in Headland, AL.

Many questions remain about how to treat target spot on cotton, but researchers do know that under the right conditions, it can lead to significant yield losses.

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Planter dust cause for concern among researchers looking into honeybee declines

From Delta Farm Press

Researchers trying to gain a better understanding of declines in bee populations have found higher concentrations of neonicotinoid insecticides in the foliage of wild flowers located along field borders than they expected.

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Georgia extension specialists give tentative recommendations on target spot

From Southeast Farm Press

“Between a rock and a hard spot.”

That’s where many Extension agents and consultants feel they’re stuck as far as target spot on cotton in Georgia.

“As Extension specialists, agents and consultants, this is really where we are,” said University of Georgia Extension plant pathologist Bob Kemerait, speaking at the recent Beltwide Cotton Conferences in New Orleans.

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Crop rotation still best long-term management strategy

In Southeast Farm Press

by Clint Thompson, University of Georgia

Pesticides are a costly but essential tool farmers use to control plant diseases and insects. Crop rotation continues to be a more reliable and economical management strategy.

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Timing continues to be a key ingredient in cotton insect control

From Delta Farm Press

For years, the boll weevil was public enemy No. 1 for Tennessee cotton farmers. The boll weevil is gone thanks to the hard work of cotton growers and research scientists. But the malathion sprays that took out the boll weevil and plant bugs are gone as well, creating an environment where plant bugs have become a major problem. The University of Tennessee’s Sandy Steckel talked about the current efforts to control the latter during a stop on the Cotton Tour at the West Tennessee Research and Education Center.

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Consultant survey paints North Carolina’s 2013 cotton insect picture

From Southeast Farm Press

By Jack Bacheler, North Carolina Extension Entomologist

Information from North Carolina’s licensed independent crop consultants is invaluable in determining cotton pest status and insecticide inputs from region to region and from one year to the next.

Their responses to our survey questionnaire are both an accurate account of the past “insect year” and represent approximately one third of North Carolina’s total cotton acreage.

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Cultural controls work best for pigweed

From Southeast Farm Press

Even the best made and implemented weed management strategies can fall short of the glory of perfect, clean fields come summer. And Palmer amaranth will take advantage where it can. As you look over the cotton field now, you see them getting bigger by the day. If all else fails, best go manhandle them out of there and keep a bad thing from getting worse next year.

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