Pros and Cons of Cover Cropping for No-till Vegetable & Row Crop Production

Pros and Cons of Cover Cropping for No-till Vegetable & Row Crop Production: Making sense of current research and past experiences

May 17TH, 2018, 8:45 AM – 4:30 PM, Madren Conference Center & Clemson Student Organic Farm, Clemson, SC

No-till vegetable production offers a more sustainable approach to weed management than the frequent use of herbicides and tillage, and promotes soil health. Because cover crop based no-till vegetable production involves a different approach to management, growers may be reluctant to transition from conventional tillage without seeing the system in action and knowing its costs and benefits compared with conventional tillage. Row crop farmers often have a concern whether cover crops, will deplete soil moisture and cause water stress for the next cash crop. In this workshop we will discuss the pros and cons of cover cropping in no-till vegetable and row crop systems based on current research and our experiences in the field over the past decade. A “Lunch and Learn” session will include demonstrations of weed ID techniques and the effectiveness of organic herbicides. Field tours of cover crop research plots at the Clemson Organic Farm (for vegetable production) and at nearby Millam Farm (row crop production) will be conducted following the Lunch and Learn session.   Continue reading

Cover crop choices must be well-planned

In Delta Farm Press

Producers who plant winter crops with no intention of harvesting them reap the benefits of soil conservation, weed control and nutrient retention.

On the flip side, however, the practice of almost constant production in a field creates issues with pest management. Farmers who “plant green” have to balance these challenges to best prepare the way for good crops each year. Continue reading

UGA Extension pecan specialist believes cover crops are valuable additions to pecan orchards

by Clint Thompson, University of Georgia

University of Georgia Cooperative Extension pecan specialist Lenny Wells recommends planting crimson clover, or a similar cover crop, in pecan orchards to supply much-needed nitrogen and build up organic matter in the soil.

Whether used in fields where row crops are produced or planted in home gardens, cover crops are most often planted during the fall. They provide nutrients that will benefit the soil profile later. Cover crops may be particularly beneficial in pecan production. Continue reading

What do farmers think about resistant weeds?

in Southeast Farm Press

Both scientists and regulators have had a lot to say about the growing problem of herbicide resistance and how weed management techniques need to change in response. However, there have been few organized opportunities for farmers to make their voices heard and to share their experiences in managing herbicide-resistant weeds.

This is changing with a series of seven regional listening sessions sponsored by the Weed Science Society of America, the United Soybean Board and the U.S. Department of Agriculture Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service. Farmers across the nation are being invited to share their challenges, successes and opinions. Continue reading

Cover crops can be beneficial with informed decisions

In Southwest Farm Press

A cover crop used in conjunction with a conservation tillage system may help conserve soil and improve soil health, fertility, water quality, weed/disease/pest control, biodiversity, and wildlife habitat.

But it requires “educated management decisions,” says Paul DeLaune, Texas AgriLife Research agronomist at Vernon, Texas. He discussed ongoing cover crop research on the Texas Rolling Plains during the Red River Crops Conference. Continue reading

Webinar: Cover Crop Management for the Southeast

This webinar on cover crop management is presented by USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service – Science and Technology, National Technology Support Centers

When: Feb 14, 2017 2:00 pm US/Eastern Continue reading

Cover crop, soil health conference in Arkansas Dec. 13-14

In Delta Farm Press

Farmers from Arkansas and surrounding states will attend the Southern Agricultural Cover Crops, Soil Health and Water Management Conference Dec. 13-14 being held at the Arkansas State University Convocation Center in Jonesboro, Ark.

The conference, co-sponsored by USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service and the Arkansas Association of Conservation Districts, is designed to help farmers learn how to successfully adopt a cover crop management system and improve soil health and water management on their operations. Continue reading