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Are You Interested in Cover Crops and Soil Health?

Pre-registration is ending next week for the Second National Conference on Cover Crops and Soil Health, being held December 7-8 in Indianapolis, IN. The pre-registration deadline is Tuesday, November 7th. 

After November 7th, the conference registration price goes from $150 to $200 for ag professionals (including university, agency, NGO and agribusiness staff). The farmer pre-registration fee is $90 and student fee is $50. Each of those will increase by $25 after November 7th. Continue reading

Conference on cover crops and soil health

Pre-registration is ending next week for the Second National Conference on Cover Crops and Soil Health, being held December 7-8 in Indianapolis, IN.  The pre-registration deadline is Tuesday, November 7th. 

After November 7th, the conference registration price goes from $150 to $200 for ag professionals (including university, agency, NGO and agribusiness staff).  The farmer pre-registration fee is $90 and student fee is $50.  Each of those will increase by $25 after November 7th. Continue reading

ATTRA Publication Offers Advice on Cover Crops

The type of cover crop best suited for you can vary depending on your climate, soil, and other needs. ATTRA’s recent publication, “Cover Crop Options for Hot and Humid Areas,” provides insight into the characteristics of cover crops that are better suited for areas with hot, humid summers, like the southern portions of Texas and Florida and along the Gulf Coast, the Caribbean, Hawaii, and points beyond with similar climatic conditions.

The publication addresses the challenge of organic crop production in hot, humid places through proper cover-crop selection and management. Which covers are most appropriate? Which can take the heat? You can find the answers free online at https://attra.ncat.org/attra-pub/summaries/summary.php?pub=570. Continue reading

Cover Crops Boost Yields and Weed Control, National Farmer Survey Says

Following the use of cover crops, farmers reported increased yields of corn, soybeans and wheat, and improved control of herbicide-resistant weeds, according to a nationwide survey. In addition, the survey of 2,012 farmers showed acreage planted in cover crops has nearly doubled over the past five years.

Survey participants—88 percent of whom use cover crops—reported that after cover crops:

  • Corn yields increased an average of 2.3 bushels per acre, or 1.3 percent;
  • Soybean yields increased 2.1 bushels per acre, or 3.8 percent;
  • Wheat yields increased 1.9 bushels per acre, or 2.8 percent.

A full summary and the complete 2017 Cover Crop Survey Report are available online at: www.sare.org/2017CoverCropSurvey Continue reading

SARE discusses cover crop survey results tomorrow in webinar

Tomorrow at noon EDT representatives from SARE, Conservation Technology Information Center (CTIC) and the American Seed Trade Association (ASTA) will host a media call following the rollout of the 2017 cover crop survey report. This marks the fifth consecutive year of the national survey which asks farmers about their views and experiences with cover crops.

Join us to hear about key findings from this survey of 2,012 farmers and to participate in a Q&A with survey organizers. Continue reading

Intercropping boosts vegetable production

by Adam Russell, Texas A&M AgriLife

The old ways could be the best ways when it comes to small-acreage vegetable production, according to a newly published article available through the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service.

Dr. Jose Franco, a U.S. Department of Agriculture Agriculture Research Service agroecologist, Mandan, North Dakota, conducted the two-year study of intercropping at the Texas A&M University Horticulture Farm in Bryan for his doctoral dissertation under the guidance of Dr. Astrid Volder, former Texas A&M University faculty and current University of California at Davis plant physiologist; Dr. Stephen King, a former professor and vegetable breeder with Texas A&M department of horticultural sciences, College Station; and Dr. Joe Masabni, AgriLife Extension small acreage horticulturist, Overton.  Continue reading

More mature cover crops help maintain residue longer

by Kay Ledbetter, Texas A&M AgriLife

Often producers planting cover crops are worried about moisture use, but more important is the longevity of the crop residue and its beneficial results, said a Texas A&M AgriLife Research scientist.

Dr. Paul DeLaune, an AgriLife Research environmental soil scientist at Vernon, said when he talks about the residue management of cover crops, one question he always gets concerns termination timing and the use of soil moisture by the cover crop. Continue reading