Weeds could develop resistance to dicamba in three generations

In Delta Farm Press

What happens if farmers follow the same practices they have when other new herbicide chemistries have come on the market over the last several decades?

If they’re not careful, they will simply replace one herbicide with another, as they did with Prowl and Treflan, ALS herbicides, glyphosate and most recently with PPO inhibitors such as Flextar and Reflex. Continue reading

Diversity is necessary in weed control

in Southwest Farm Press

South Texas, or coastal Texas, is a unique region of the greater Southwest, marked by a sub-tropical climate, unique soils and a host of both advantages and disadvantages when it comes to agriculture.

The warmer climate allows for an extended growing season, and its relationship with the tropical Gulf of Mexico offers some clear advantages, like seasonal rains, but also unique challenges, not the least of which is an environment conducive to the rapid growth and propagation of noxious and damaging weed varieties. Continue reading

Texas specialists look at lentils as possibility in crop rotation

by Kay Ledbetter, Texas A&M AgriLife

Just as lentils add variety to a soup, Dr. Emi Kimura believes they could add variety to the crop options for wheat producers in the Rolling Plains.

Lentils are legumes that grow in pods on a bushy plant, and as a legume, they are high in nitrogen, which would be beneficial for the following wheat crop, Kimura, a Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service agronomist in Vernon, said. Continue reading

Weed Control & Soil Health Go Hand-in-Hand

by South Dakota State University

Although many landowners may not give much thought to weed control as a soil health measure, Gared Shaffer, SDSU Extension Weeds Field Specialist said the two go hand-in-hand.

“The same management practices which increase soil health, like planting cover crops or a diverse cash crop rotation, also can be deterrent to weeds,” Shaffer explained. With the rise of herbicide resistant weeds not just on the horizon but in your fields, farmers want answers. Most have turned to a new herbicide in the past. Continue reading

Rotation time matters when it comes to peanuts

In Southeast Farm Press

by John Hart, Southeast Farm Press

Irrigation significantly improves peanut yields in all rotation systems while the length of rotations also influences yield, according to research conducted in Georgia.

In a paper presented to the annual meeting of the American Peanut Research and Education Society, Marshall Lamb, research leader and scientist at the USDA Agricultural Research Laboratory National Peanut Research Laboratory in Dawson, Ga., presented findings that show there was no statistical difference in peanut yield when either corn or cotton was the prior crop to peanuts. But the research shows the length of rotation did make a difference. Continue reading

Promising Potential of Pulse Crops in crop rotations

An American Society of Agronomy Webinar

Research-based Reasons and Real-life Lessons for Adding Pulse Crops into Crop Rotation Systems!

Pulses is a broad term that includes multiple varieties of beans and peas:  dry beans, garbanzo beans, black-eyed peas, and lentils, to name a few. The webinar speakers will explore the history, current uses, and outlook for pulses in North American agriculture, so that you can share those opportunities with your clients. Continue reading

Peanut-cotton rotations help prevent nematodes, weeds

In Southwest Farm Press

Peanuts are a good complement to cotton, especially in fields infested with cotton root knot nematodes, says Jason Woodward, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension plant pathologist at Lubbock. The microscopic pest won’t affect peanuts and the peanut root knot nematode won’t injure cotton.

He discussed the nematode factor and peanut best management practices by Skype hookup during the recent Red River Crops Conference at Altus, Okla., as well as disease issues, varieties, and market types. Continue reading