Rotation time matters when it comes to peanuts

In Southeast Farm Press

by John Hart, Southeast Farm Press

Irrigation significantly improves peanut yields in all rotation systems while the length of rotations also influences yield, according to research conducted in Georgia.

In a paper presented to the annual meeting of the American Peanut Research and Education Society, Marshall Lamb, research leader and scientist at the USDA Agricultural Research Laboratory National Peanut Research Laboratory in Dawson, Ga., presented findings that show there was no statistical difference in peanut yield when either corn or cotton was the prior crop to peanuts. But the research shows the length of rotation did make a difference. Continue reading

Promising Potential of Pulse Crops in crop rotations

An American Society of Agronomy Webinar

Research-based Reasons and Real-life Lessons for Adding Pulse Crops into Crop Rotation Systems!

Pulses is a broad term that includes multiple varieties of beans and peas:  dry beans, garbanzo beans, black-eyed peas, and lentils, to name a few. The webinar speakers will explore the history, current uses, and outlook for pulses in North American agriculture, so that you can share those opportunities with your clients. Continue reading

Peanut-cotton rotations help prevent nematodes, weeds

In Southwest Farm Press

Peanuts are a good complement to cotton, especially in fields infested with cotton root knot nematodes, says Jason Woodward, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension plant pathologist at Lubbock. The microscopic pest won’t affect peanuts and the peanut root knot nematode won’t injure cotton.

He discussed the nematode factor and peanut best management practices by Skype hookup during the recent Red River Crops Conference at Altus, Okla., as well as disease issues, varieties, and market types. Continue reading

Root knot nematode is a real problem for peanuts

In Southeast Farm Press

Rome Ethredge, Contributing writer

I remember one year a grower was going to plant peanuts in a small field that had been in pasture for over 15 years. He said the last time he had peanuts there he had noticed some nematode damage at harvest time. We thought that with the good rotation, he shouldn’t have a problem. We were wrong.

The peanut root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne arenaria) is a force to be reckoned with and caused yield limiting damage again after all those years since we used no nematicide or resistant variety. Continue reading

Dealing with herbicide issues when rotating crops

In Southeast Farm Press

It’s a question Alan York gets every year: “I lost a crop, what can I plant there next year?”

For the most part, the question comes from cotton and corn producers, explains York, professor of crop science at North Carolina State University. “The tobacco people are going to reset tobacco, and peanut guys are going to want to plant peanuts, and soybean people are going to replant soybeans,” York says. Continue reading

North Florida farmers are using sesame as a rotation crop

At University of Florida

by Kimberly Moore Wilmoth, University of Florida

In between seasons of corn, peanut, and cotton, North Florida farmers were interested in growing a rotation crop that could withstand the wilting heat of summer and be harvested by machine.

So, since 2011, University of Florida researchers have been experimenting with growing the tiny seeds you find on top of hamburger buns or garnishing salads – sesame – as a viable, money-making crop.  Continue reading

Crop rotation in cotton is a sound strategy

In Southwest Farm Press

Crop rotation may be one of the most basic production techniques for maintaining soil health and increasing productivity.

Over the years, experts have claimed reduced disease pressure, fewer weeds, less insect damage, and improved nutrient levels on fields that farmers routinely rotated from one crop to another.

Continue reading