Root knot nematode is a real problem for peanuts

In Southeast Farm Press

Rome Ethredge, Contributing writer

I remember one year a grower was going to plant peanuts in a small field that had been in pasture for over 15 years. He said the last time he had peanuts there he had noticed some nematode damage at harvest time. We thought that with the good rotation, he shouldn’t have a problem. We were wrong.

The peanut root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne arenaria) is a force to be reckoned with and caused yield limiting damage again after all those years since we used no nematicide or resistant variety. Continue reading

Dealing with herbicide issues when rotating crops

In Southeast Farm Press

It’s a question Alan York gets every year: “I lost a crop, what can I plant there next year?”

For the most part, the question comes from cotton and corn producers, explains York, professor of crop science at North Carolina State University. “The tobacco people are going to reset tobacco, and peanut guys are going to want to plant peanuts, and soybean people are going to replant soybeans,” York says. Continue reading

North Florida farmers are using sesame as a rotation crop

At University of Florida

by Kimberly Moore Wilmoth, University of Florida

In between seasons of corn, peanut, and cotton, North Florida farmers were interested in growing a rotation crop that could withstand the wilting heat of summer and be harvested by machine.

So, since 2011, University of Florida researchers have been experimenting with growing the tiny seeds you find on top of hamburger buns or garnishing salads – sesame – as a viable, money-making crop.  Continue reading

Crop rotation in cotton is a sound strategy

In Southwest Farm Press

Crop rotation may be one of the most basic production techniques for maintaining soil health and increasing productivity.

Over the years, experts have claimed reduced disease pressure, fewer weeds, less insect damage, and improved nutrient levels on fields that farmers routinely rotated from one crop to another.

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Controlling weeds in wheat is difficult but not impossible

From Southwest Farm Press

Controlling weeds in wheat may never have been particularly easy, but increasing pressure from herbicide-resistant weeds makes the chore a bit more complicated.

But it’s not impossible, says David Drake, Texas AgriLife Extension agronomist who works out of the Research and Extension Center in San Angelo. Drake says six factors play important roles in effective weed control.

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Carolina Cover Crops Workshop

Workshop will be at The Roper Mountain Science Center, October 3, 2014, 9 AM – 5 PM

Interested in finding out how to use annual cover crops in your crop rotation? Not sure what a cover crop is or how to select one for your region? Wondering if cover crops can be used in a no-till system?  Instructors of this one day class will discuss this and more details including:

  • how cover crops are beneficial
  • the difference in a cover crop and green manure
  • when to plant your cover crops
  • crop choices by season
  • when to mow/incorporate

Plus, there will be a hands on portion to this workshop (so bring your work gloves!)

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Fungicides, rotation and diversity keep peanut disease in check

From Delta Farm Press

Rainfall is a blessing most of the time for dryland peanut farmers along the Mississippi Gulf Coast, but it can also be a curse for fighting peanut diseases. For peanut producer Steve Seward, crop rotation, diversity and a strong fungicide program help keep disease in check and yields consistently high.

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