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  • Funded by USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture

    The Southern Region IPM Center is located at North Carolina State University, 1730 Varsity Drive, Suite 110, Raleigh, NC 27606, and is sponsored by the United States Department of Agriculture, National Institute of Food and Agriculture.
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Understanding Cycles of Pests and Diseases and Their Interaction with the Environment

For farmers, successful use of cultural disease and insect pest management methods to prevent and/or avoid problems before they occur depends on an understanding of pathogen and pest life cycles and also how their development may be affected by weather conditions.  In this workshop, vegetable disease and insect pest management experts will discuss life cycles of key disease pathogens and insect pests affecting vegetables both above and below-ground. They will also explain how growers may use this information to implement certain cultural management practices that help to prevent or avoid disease and pest problems, and how changes in weather can affect disease and pest development. The workshop will conclude with a session on selection and application of organic insecticides for use in vegetables. Continue reading

UGA entomologist encourages the use of cultural practices in managing spotted wing drosophila (SWD)

by Clint Thompson, University of Georgia

University of Georgia entomologist Ashfaq Sial advises Georgia blueberry farmers to manage the spotted wing drosophila (SWD), the crop’s most destructive pest, by incorporating cultural practices into farming.

Practices likes heavy pruning, controlled burns of the wooded areas surrounding blueberry fields, and the use of weed mat as a ground cover are effective management tools. These practices ensure the success of SWD management programs implemented during harvest, the time when blueberries are most vulnerable to SWD infestations. Continue reading