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    The Southern Region IPM Center is located at North Carolina State University, 1730 Varsity Drive, Suite 110, Raleigh, NC 27606, and is sponsored by the United States Department of Agriculture, National Institute of Food and Agriculture.
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Experts expect insect problems to get worse

in Southeast Farm Press

From whiteflies in southern Georgia to bollworms in North Carolina to plant bugs in Virginia, 2016 was a challenging insect year for cotton growers across the Southeast. Dominic Reisig is urging farmers to be prepared for another challenging year.

Reisig, North Carolina State University Extension entomologist, addressed “Emerging Insect Issues in the Southeast” at the annual meeting of the Southern Cotton Growers and Southeastern Cotton Ginners in Charlotte, N.C., Jan. 20, where he provided an insect situation, outlook report and control recommendations. Continue reading

Study shows Bt trait in corn having reduced effectiveness

By Matt Shipman, NC State University

A new study from North Carolina State University and Clemson University finds that the toxin in a widely used genetically modified (GM) crop is having little impact on the crop pest called corn earworm (Helicoverpa zea) – which is consistent with predictions made almost 20 years ago that had been largely ignored. The study may be a signal to pay closer attention to warning signs about the development of resistance in agricultural pests to GM crops.

At issue is genetically engineered corn that produces a Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) protein which, in turn produces a toxin called Cry1Ab. This GM corn was originally designed to address a pest called the European corn borer (Ostrinia nubilalis) and went on the market in 1996.

Continue reading

Neonicotinoid-resistant thrips showing up in North Carolina

In Southeast Farm Press

North Carolina now has neonicotinoid-resistant thrips; not a good thing for cotton producers in the state, said Dominic Reisig, North Carolina State University Extension entomologist.

Continue reading

Resistant armyworm march north is mystery to NCSU specialists

By Matt Shipman, North Carolina State University

In fall 2013, Dr. Dominic Reisig got a phone call from a farmer in rural Hyde County. The farmer was growing corn, and it was literally falling apart in the field. What was going on?

Reisig, an entomologist with NC State University’s College of Agriculture and Life Sciences and its Cooperative Extension Service, is a sort of science detective who specializes in insects that pose a threat to crops. And the farmer had presented him with a mystery.

Continue reading

Should NC soybean growers spray for stink bugs?

In Southeast Farm Press

by Dominic Reisig, NC State University

Right now we are witnessing typical end-of-season insect patterns.  Multigenerational bean leaf beetle populations densities are at their highest now and soybeans with developing seed are stink bug magnets.

Continue reading

Looper numbers picking up in North Carolina soybeans

In Southeast Farm Press

By Dominic Reisig, NC State University Extension Entomologist

Looper numbers have really picked up in soybeans.  Loopers are migratory pests that sometimes show up late season and eat leaves, but not pods or seeds.

Continue reading

Worms and stinkbugs causing problems in NC this year

In Southeast Farm Press

by John Hart

North Carolina State University Extension Entomologist Dominic Reisig says this year is shaping up to be one of the worst years ever for plant bugs in the state with heavier infestations of stink bugs, tobacco budworms and corn earworms being found in more fields.

Continue reading