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UGA plant pathologist cautions Georgia grape growers against fungicide resistance to downy mildew

By Clint Thompson, University of Georgia

Fungicide resistance to downy mildew disease is a growing concern for Georgia grape producers. University of Georgia Extension Fruit Disease Specialist Phil Brannen advises growers to modify their fungicide applications to combat the increasing resistance.

“If producers properly rotate the chemical ingredients (used in the different fungicides) that treat for downy mildew, this will help our chemical classes be sustainable for years to come,” Brannen said. “We have already essentially lost one of our fungicides — the quinone outside inhibitors (Qol) — and we simply can’t afford to lose more classes if we are to manage this aggressive disease in the future.” Continue reading

Downy mildew resistant varieties of sweet basil now available

Four new varieties of sweet basil resistant to downy mildew are now available to growers.

Rutgers University-New Brunswick announced in June that collaborative research and variety selection had spawned seeds for new varieties resistant to the dreaded disease. Continue reading

Weather and pests can make summer squash a frustrating crop for home gardeners

by Sharon Dowdy, University of Georgia

Pests and diseases make summer squash one of the most challenging vegetables to grow in Georgia home gardens, according to University of Georgia plant pathologist Elizabeth Little, who studies plant diseases and control methods at the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.

“Through my plant pathology experience and observations, I’ve noticed what is most difficult to grow in Georgia’s hot, muggy summers. Squash tops the list,” Little said. “That’s why summer squash will grow better where summer conditions are cooler and drier.” Continue reading

Downy mildew makes E. coli more likely to contaminate lettuce

in USDA Agricultural Research Service News.

Escherichia coli O157:H7, a bacterium that causes foodborne illness in humans, is more likely to contaminate lettuce when downy mildew is already present, according to U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) scientists.

Downy mildew, a lettuce disease caused by the fungus-like water mold Bremia lactucae, is one of the biggest problems that lettuce growers must deal with.

Continue reading

Survey on impacts of impatiens downy mildew

Researchers at Cornell Cooperative Extension, Cornell University, and Michigan State University are conducting a survey that seeks to determine the impacts of impatiens downy mildew on the greenhouse industry.  No personally identifiable information will be released from this study, as all numbers will become part of an aggregate number

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Plant pathologist keeps growers alerted to downy mildew risk

It wouldn’t be fall without pumpkins, and a University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food and Environment plant pathologist is part of an extension network that helps producers protect their pumpkins and other cucurbits from a potentially devastating disease.

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Impatiens downy mildew widespread in Kentucky

A new disease affecting a popular bedding and container plant will likely change the look of Kentucky gardens for years to come, said Nicole Ward Gauthier, extension plant pathologist for the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food and Environment.

Continue reading