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New Drone Technology has Potential to Save Citrus Trees and Money

 

A new study from the University of Florida found that using drone technology can “save growers time, money, and labor costs.”  Instead of manually counting the number of trees in groves, these drones give farmers the ability to more accurately represent numbers of citrus trees, while also gaining the ability to monitor trees’ health, traits, and location.

Drone demonstration at the NC State Fair. Photo by Marc Hall

 

 

Find the full article here.

Texas A&M AgriLife researchers push drones to ‘read the weeds’

by Kay Ledbetter, Texas A&M AgriLife

Even barely poking through the ground, weeds are distinctive. Determining the right tools for early identification and control are the goals of an ongoing Texas A&M AgriLife Research project.

Dr. Muthu Bagavathiannan, AgriLife Research weed scientist in College Station, is using unmanned aerial vehicles, or UAVs, to “read the weeds.” Continue reading

LSU demonstrates what drones can do for agriculture

In Delta Farm Press

Drones can provide an aerial view of a crop’s progress and health, but they won’t replace scouting fields on foot, LSU AgCenter researchers advised at a March 16 drone workshop held at the AgCenter Dean Lee Research Station.

Dennis Burns, LSU AgCenter county agent in Tensas Parish, said insects can’t be detected by air unless crop damage is extensive. “The images are only going to show so much.” Continue reading

Japanese scientists create drone to help with pollination

Scientists at Japan’s National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology are using the mechanics of cross-pollination with bees to create a drone that can pick up pollen in one flower and bring it to another.

The drone, which is controlled manually, is 4 centimeters wide and weighs about 15 grams. The bottom of the drone is covered with a sticky-gel-coated horsehair that picks up pollen from one flower and rubs them off on another flower. The research team has been able to successfully cross-pollinate Japanese lilies with the drone. Continue reading

Drones will help farmers grow better crops

Farmers will be using drones in the near future to monitor and improve their crops to help feed a hungry world, say Texas A&M AgriLife Research scientists who are now developing the technology.

“Unmanned aerial vehicles, or drones, will soon play a major role in meeting the challenges of feeding a growing global population,” said Dr. Juan Enciso, an AgriLife Research irrigation engineer in Weslaco. Continue reading

New research project will study how technology can help field scouting

In Growing Georgia

By Allison Floyd

Imagine if you could simply look at a pest in the field to take a photograph of it? What if in the same glance you could draw on the knowledge of agronomists and entomologists around the globe to identify the pest and learn how to fight it?

Those scenarios may not be as far out as they sound.

Continue reading