U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Water Reuse, Water Scarcity, and Drought Grants Progress Review Meeting & Webinar

Meeting Information

EPA is hosting a two-day conference and webinar highlighting research from the Human and Ecological Health Impacts Associated with Water Reuse and Conservation Practices and National Priorities: Systems-Based Strategies to Improve the Nation’s Ability to Plan and Respond to Water Scarcity and Drought Due to Climate Change Request for Applications (RFA). Register today to participate in person or via webinar!

Under the Human and Ecological Health Impacts Associated with Water Reuse and Conservation Practices RFA, EPA awarded grants to five institutions for research that measures the health and ecological impacts of water conservation practices such as potable reuse and agricultural water reuse. Continue reading

USFS Drought and invasive species webinar – September 14

The next US Forest Service drought webinar entitled “Drought and Invasive Species” is scheduled for Thursday September 14, 2017 from 2 to 3:30pm EST.  Directors Allen Rowley and Cindi West will provide opening remarks followed by several excellent speakers.

They anticipate a stimulating discussion with questions and answers. You may also earn continuing education credits if you are interested. Please call using conference line: 877-369-5243 and passcode: 0368706#.  To view the presentations, please connect using  http://climatewebinars.net/webinars/drought-invasives.  If you are in Washington, DC and would like to join in person, please come to the Civilian Conservation Corps room (PNW04) in the Yates building. Continue reading

Webinar: Drought and Invasive Species

This webinar is presented by SREF & Forest Service Office of Sustainability and Climate.

What will you learn?

Drought creates the potential for invasive plant species to increase in diversity and abundance in a variety of ecosystems, often mediated by the occurrence of disturbances (wildfire, insect outbreaks). Learn more… Continue reading

Invasive insects turn forests into wasteland

by Michael Casey and Patrick Whittle, Associated Press

In a towering forest of centuries-old eastern hemlocks, it’s easy to miss one of the tree’s nemeses. No larger than a speck of pepper, the Hemlock woolly adelgid spends its life on the underside of needles sucking sap, eventually killing the tree.

The bug is one in an expanding army of insects draining the life out of forests from New England to the West Coast. Aided by global trade, a warming climate and drought-weakened trees, the invaders have become one of the greatest threats to biodiversity in the United States. Continue reading

Lack of rain means more cornstalk borers in peanuts

In Georgia FACES

by Clint Thompson, University of Georgia

A lack of rain or cooler weather this summer means more calls for University of Georgia peanut entomologist Mark Abney regarding lesser cornstalk borers.

Because Georgia has suffered through droughtlike conditions all summer, granular insecticide treatments in nonirrigated peanuts are ineffective due to the need for rain to soak the chemical into the soil. Without rain, those peanuts are susceptible to the pest, which can cause significant damage to the crop. Continue reading

High-heat, low rainfall set the stage for harmful algal blooms and cyanobacteria

In Georgia FACES

by By Merritt Melancon, University of Georgia

With the summer heat and sporadic rainfall, conditions are right for farm ponds to become inundated with harmful algal blooms.

Each summer, University of Georgia Cooperative Extension receives reports of dogs, cattle, people and other livestock being sickened by contact with pond and lake water contaminated with cyanobacteria, an algaelike bacteria. This summer, given the drought conditions affecting much of north Georgia, Extension agents and researchers are expecting to see an uptick in harmful algal blooms. They’re asking farmers to be on the lookout. Continue reading

Tips for Managing Drought Stressed Turfgrass

At UGA Extension

by Greg Huber, University of Georgia

During periods of hot and dry weather, certain modifications to your lawn maintenance practices will help to carry your turfgrass through periods of inadequate rainfall and reduce losses. The height of the warm-season turfgrass growing season spans May through August. Given average conditions (regular rainfall and moderate temperatures), bermudagrass, zoysiagrass, St. Augustinegrass, centipedegrass, and other warm-season species respond quickly to cultural and maintenance practices such as mowing, fertilizing, aerating, topdressing, and weed management.  However, the summer of 2016 has delivered hot and dry weather with less than normal rainfall.  With August approaching, now is the time to fine tune your turf management program to salvage an acceptable appearance while minimizing growth until environmental factors improve. Continue reading