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  • Funded by USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture

    The Southern Region IPM Center is located at North Carolina State University, 1730 Varsity Drive, Suite 110, Raleigh, NC 27606, and is sponsored by the United States Department of Agriculture, National Institute of Food and Agriculture.
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Scientists work to prevent African swine fever in US

African swine fever virus threatens to devastate the swine industry and is positioned to spread throughout Asia. The virus has spread throughout the Caucuses region of Eastern Europe and was reported in China in August. It recently was detected in wild boar in Belgium.

Kansas State University researchers and the Biosecurity Research Institute have several projects focused on African swine fever. Their research topics vary, but they share the same goal of stopping the spread of African swine fever and preventing it from reaching the U.S. Continue reading

Newly discovered pig virus is potential human health threat

A recently identified pig virus can readily find its way into laboratory-cultured cells of people and other species, a discovery that raises concerns about the potential for outbreaks that threaten human and animal health.

Researchers at The Ohio State University and Utrecht University in the Netherlands collaborated to better understand the new virus and its potential reach. Their study, the first to point to possible transmission of this virus between species, appears online in the journal PNAS. Continue reading

Wild hogs continue to be a nuisance for farmers

In Delta Farm Press

Rooting and wallowing by wild hogs cause extensive land and crop damage, which can be stopped only by getting rid of the invasive animals.

Bill Hamrick, a wildlife associate with the Mississippi State University Extension Service, said wild hogs use their snouts to turn over soil as they search for food. Continue reading

Experts: Use safe practices when processing, cooking feral hogs

by Blair Fannin, Texas A&M AgriLife

With a proliferation of feral hogs in Texas, control measures such as trapping and hunting can yield the rewards of good table fare. However, feral hogs can carry  parasites, such as hookworms, and experts advise to use safe cooking practices before consuming the meat.

“Feral hogs are destructive in nature and their daily patterns include both feeding and fighting,” said Dr. Tom Hairgrove, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service specialist in College Station. “They fight off other feral hogs in their daily activities of searching for food and can incur lesions or open wounds. This may create openings for parasites and lead to infections, discoloring the meat, etc. That’s why it’s good for those who process feral hogs to be on the lookout for any abnormalities and use safe practices when processing the meat.” Continue reading

Upcoming IPM webinars

Please consider attending the 2018 All Bugs Good and Bad Webinar Series, which provides information about beneficial and pest insects. Webinars are free and open to everyone. Webinars will be on the first Friday of each month at 2 p.m. Eastern timeContinue reading

Feral hog problem continues in Texas

In Southwest Farm Press

A war has been raging across Texas for a very long time, a man-versus-beast battle that rages across the plains, the Hill Country, the Blacklands, Pineywoods, the South Texas brush country, on sparsely populated rural lands and on open spaces and alleyways of larger cities.

The enemy in Texas runs in large numbers, stealthy at night when they do their greatest damage, and smart enough to often avoid traps and the growing numbers of hunters that pursue them.

And they can be very dangerous, and terribly destructive at their best. Continue reading

Specialists to talk about deer, wild pigs Aug. 29 in Marshall

by Adam Russell, Texas A&M AgriLife

An informational meeting about white-tailed deer and wild pigs is set for 5:30 p.m. Aug. 29 in Marshall.

The event, sponsored by the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service offices in Harrison and Panola counties, will be at the Marshall Civic Center, 2501 East End Blvd. S. and is free and open to the public. Dinner is included. Continue reading