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    The Southern Region IPM Center is located at North Carolina State University, 1730 Varsity Drive, Suite 110, Raleigh, NC 27606, and is sponsored by the United States Department of Agriculture, National Institute of Food and Agriculture.
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New Drone Technology has Potential to Save Citrus Trees and Money

 

A new study from the University of Florida found that using drone technology can “save growers time, money, and labor costs.”  Instead of manually counting the number of trees in groves, these drones give farmers the ability to more accurately represent numbers of citrus trees, while also gaining the ability to monitor trees’ health, traits, and location.

Drone demonstration at the NC State Fair. Photo by Marc Hall

 

 

Find the full article here.

Bermudagrass stem maggots on the move across Florida pastures

In Southeast Farm Press

By Liza Garcia-Jimenez, University of Florida

The first high populations of Bermudagrass stem maggot are now occurring in Central Florida and likely will be seen in North Florida any day now, if not already.

The adult stage of this pest are small flies.  The flies lay eggs in Bermudagrass fields of all types.  The maggots or larva hatch and burrow in the top node of the plant and feed, eventually killing the top leaf shoot.  Loss of both quality and quantity of Bermudagrass hay results. Producers should be on the lookout for BSM populations, signs of which are manifested by a brown coloring to the field that should be green.

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