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  • Funded by USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture

    The Southern Region IPM Center is located at North Carolina State University, 1730 Varsity Drive, Suite 110, Raleigh, NC 27606, and is sponsored by the United States Department of Agriculture, National Institute of Food and Agriculture.
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Hardwood forest management for health and productivity

You are invited to attend our latest Live Webinar sponsored by: Southern Regional Extension Forestry.

Title: Hardwood forest management for health and productivity

What will you learn?
 This webinar will cover ecology and management in hardwood stands of the southeastern U.S., with a focus on timber management. learn more here…  Continue reading

Forest Farming Intensive for all levels

Organic Growers School, in partnership with the Appalachian Beginning Forest Farmers Coalition and Warren Wilson College, is pleased to host a two-day Forest Farming Intensive for farmers, and forest landowners of all skill levels in Appalachia and beyond who are interesting in starting, expanding, or diversifying a forest farming operation. The event will be held at Warren Wilson College in Swannanoa, NC on September 30th & October 1st, 2017. Continue reading

Fall cankerworm biology, ecology, and management in urban and rural landscapes

The fall cankerworm, Alsophila pometaria, is a moth native to North America whose caterpillars are commonly called inchworms.  While this defoliator generally remains at low abundances, occasional outbreaks may occur.  Defoliation rarely hurts the tree, but may act as a stress agent if prolonged outbreaks occur.  This webinar will cover the biology and ecology of cankerworms, as well as management strategies.  Management in urban areas as well as in rural areas will be covered. Continue reading

From Research to Extension: 5 Things I Learned When I Changed My Science Career Path

by David Coyle, Ph.D., Southern Regional Extension Forestry

Dr. Coyle is a member of the Southern IPM Center Advisory Council. This post was originally on Entomology Today, but we wanted to share Dr. Coyle’s experience on our site as well.

A couple of years ago, I changed careers. No, I didn’t leave science altogether; rather, I switched from a research career (the “tenure-track” path, if you will) to a 100 percent extension job. Continue reading

New Mexico Forest Entomologist and Forest Health Program Coordinator

Job Title: Forest Health Program Manager (EMNRD Position #59953)

Closing Date/Time: Friday 9/15/2017 11:59 PM Mountain Time

Salary: $31,782.00 – $55,307.00 Annually

Job Type: Permanent Position

Location: Santa Fe, New Mexico Continue reading

US Forest Service establishes Incident Team in Mississippi for southern pine beetle

The U.S. Forest Service announced today that it has established an Incident Management Team to direct efforts to suppress southern pine beetle infestations that threaten to damage tens of thousands of acres of pine forests in Mississippi.

Forest Health officials have classified the level of infestations as a severe outbreak. “This outbreak is unprecedented in scope with beetle activity progressing at breakneck speed with infestations rapidly escalating in size, coalescing, and decimating whole plantations,” said Jim Meeker, an entomologist with the Forest Service. Continue reading

New tree app builds partnerships between citizens and scientists

by Carol Lea Spence, University of Kentucky

TreeSnap, new phone app developed by the University of Kentucky Forest Health Research Center and the University of Tennessee Department of Entomology and Plant Pathology for Android and iOS cell phones is designed to connect scientists with foresters, landowners and interested citizens in an effort to protect and restore the nation’s trees.

A team led by Bert Abbott of the UK Forest Health Research and Education Center and a University of Tennessee team led by Meg Staton developed the free app as a part of a $3 million grant from the National Science Foundation Plant Genome Research Program. The partnership is part of a larger collaboration with Washington State University and the University of Connecticut. Continue reading