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  • Funded by USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture

    The Southern Region IPM Center is located at North Carolina State University, 1730 Varsity Drive, Suite 110, Raleigh, NC 27606, and is sponsored by the United States Department of Agriculture, National Institute of Food and Agriculture.
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Forest Management Affects how Beetle Outbreaks and Wildfire alter Ecosystems: Lessons from Northern Colorado and the Fraser Experimental Forest

Forest Management Affects how Beetle Outbreaks and Wildfire alter Ecosystems:  Lessons from Northern Colorado and the Fraser Experimental Forest – Chuck Rhoades, Rocky Mountain Research Station

Date: Tuesday, October 30, 2018

Time: 12 pm MDT

REGISTER | GET CEUS  Continue reading

Balsam woolly adelgid: the smallest and biggest reason to reconsider the importance of subalpine fir

Forest Service staff have noted widespread and rapid subalpine fir mortality across forests in western ID & UT. The non-native, invasive balsam woolly adelgid (BWA), Adelges piceae Ratzburg, was confirmed as the primary insect responsible for large areas of subalpine fir mortality in Utah on September 6, 2017. This webinar will provide background on the current status of the true fir host type in Utah and beyond.  Webinar content will explain biology, ecology and movement of BWA and how this insect kills trees. We will also discuss practical skills for field identification and current management options. Drawing on our current collaborative efforts, the webinar will close with a question answer session hosted by several entomologists.

Speaker: Fred Hain, Professor Emeritus, NC State University &  Steve Cook, Professor, University of Idaho Continue reading

Southern pine beetles becoming a problem in Mississippi

In Delta Farm Press

Mississippi is having a breakout of tiny beetles that use pheromones to gather sufficient numbers of reinforcements to overwhelm healthy trees.

Current Mississippi Forestry Commission flyovers indicate nearly 5,000 separate Southern pine bark beetle outbreaks across the state. Outbreaks can range from just a few trees to more than an acre of infested and dying pines. Continue reading

Woodland management is focus of UK forestry extension short course

by Carol Lea Spence, University of Kentucky

Kentucky forests are becoming fragmented, and landowners’ objectives are changing. Woodland owners who are wondering how to get the most from their property can benefit from attending one of three short courses being offered around the state this summer by the University of Kentucky Cooperative Extension Service.

Kentucky boasts nearly 12.5 million acres of forests. More than 300,000 families and individuals own fewer than 10 acres. Well-managed forests can provide extra income and recreational opportunities for their owners, as well as a beneficial environment for wildlife. The 2017 Woodland Owners Short Course will cover all those aspects for both novice and experienced landowners.
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Forestry webinar series kicks off Nov. 1

By Carol Lea Spence, University of Kentucky

University of Kentucky Cooperative Extension Service will offer a forestry webinar series on five evenings in November and December. The idea behind the web-based series is to provide woodland owners with a convenient way to gain beneficial information they can use on their own properties.

The series is designed primarily for woodland owners, but anyone interested in woodland, timber and wildlife topics is welcome to participate. Those who have attended the Kentucky Woodland Owners Short Course or other UK Department of Forestry educational programs will find new and valuable information in the webinar series. Continue reading

Chestnut plantings show promise in WNC

From the Watauga Democrat:

Although the mighty chestnut is little more than a memory in the Appalachian Mountains, efforts continue as part of a vision to bring the forest giants back.

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