Exotic Forest Pest Educator Position Available Immediately

Purdue University’s Department of Entomology is seeking a creative individual to serve as Exotic Forest Pest Educator.  This individual will develop Indiana’s Forest Pest Outreach Survey & Program to educate citizen scientists about invasive species and how to report them.

Requirements include a Bachelor’s degree in Entomology, Forest Entomology, Urban Forestry, Horticulture, Wildlife, Environmental Science and Technology, Technical Writing, Speech Communication or related field; and at least two years’ experience working with invasive species, the horticultural industry, pests of forests or trees, or in some field of technical mass media communication.  Continue reading

Emerald ash borer is in Charlotte, NC

in the Charlotte Observer

by Bruce Henderson

An invasive insect that has killed millions of ash trees across the U.S. has arrived in Charlotte, a city official said Tuesday.

The emerald ash borer was first detected in North Carolina in 2013 after invading most other eastern states. It was a matter of time before the metallic green beetle appeared in Charlotte, experts told the Observer earlier this spring. Continue reading

The Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) Regulated Area Expands in Kansas to include Atchison County

Effective immediately, the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) is adding Atchison County in Kansas to the list of regulated areas for the emerald ash borer (EAB). APHIS is taking this action in response to the detection of EAB in Atchison County.

To prevent the spread of EAB to other states, the attached Federal Order outlines specific conditions for the interstate movement of EAB-regulated articles from the quarantined areas in Kansas. Specifically, the interstate movement of EAB-host wood and wood products from the quarantined areas in Kansas is regulated, including firewood of all hardwood species, nursery stock, green lumber, waste, compost, and chips of ash species. Continue reading

The People Have Spoken: Using Forest and Firewood National Polling Data to Promote Forest Health

This webinar will discuss results from a national survey of citizen attitudes toward invasive species, firewood movement, and forest health. This webinar is jointly sponsored by the SREF Forest Health and Invasive Species Program and the Firewood Outreach Coordinating Initiative.

This webinar is scheduled for Jan 25, 2017 1:00 pm US/Eastern. Continue reading

Invasive insects turn forests into wasteland

by Michael Casey and Patrick Whittle, Associated Press

In a towering forest of centuries-old eastern hemlocks, it’s easy to miss one of the tree’s nemeses. No larger than a speck of pepper, the Hemlock woolly adelgid spends its life on the underside of needles sucking sap, eventually killing the tree.

The bug is one in an expanding army of insects draining the life out of forests from New England to the West Coast. Aided by global trade, a warming climate and drought-weakened trees, the invaders have become one of the greatest threats to biodiversity in the United States. Continue reading

Want to help in the fight against emerald ash borer? Here’s what you need to know

Emerald ash borer (EAB), an exotic invasive from Asia, has infested 24 states and 2 Canadian provinces. It was discovered in Michigan in 2001, but scientists believe it had been in the country since the early 1990s. Because ash is one of the most common tree genera in North America, the pest’s prolific nature and fatal impact on trees make it the most economically and ecologically costly forest insect to invade North America. The information below is meant to help you understand more about EAB and be able to help slow its spread.

Continue reading

Western NC wages battle against pests

From the Asheville Citizen-Times

Ten years ago, before the effects of the woolly adelgid were seen in Western North Carolina, forests were lush with majestic hemlock trees.

Today, in the blink of an eye in geological time, millions of the evergreen trees have been lost from Alabama to Maine, victims of the tiny insect from Japan that has found a favorable climate.

Continue reading