Tree researchers gather in Lexington to share work in saving native trees

By Carol Lea Spence, University of Kentucky

Every day, American forests, both rural and urban, fight for their health against invasive species and pests. Scientists around the country are working diligently to protect and restore some iconic native species. Many of those scientific partners will gather in Lexington in mid-July to share their research findings.

The public also is welcome to come hear about their progress during a free, public seminar, Forests of the Future, 7 p.m. EDT July 11 at the Fayette County Extension office, 1140 Harry Sykes Way, Lexington. Continue reading

Balsam woolly adelgid: the smallest and biggest reason to reconsider the importance of subalpine fir

Forest Service staff have noted widespread and rapid subalpine fir mortality across forests in ID and UT. The non-native, invasive balsam woolly adelgid (BWA), Adelges piceae Ratzburg, was confirmed as the primary insect responsible for large areas of subalpine fir mortality in Utah on September 6, 2017. This webinar will provide background on the current status of the true fir host type in Utah and beyond. Webinar content will explain biology, ecology and movement of BWA and how this insect kills trees. We will also discuss practical skills for field identification and current management options. Drawing on our current collaborative efforts, the webinar will close with a question answer session hosted by several entomologists. Continue reading

Eradication Program Announces 2018 Plans for Fighting the Asian Longhorned Beetle

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) is announcing 2018 Asian longhorned beetle (ALB) eradication plans. APHIS, together with the New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets, the Massachusetts Department of Conservation and Recreation, and the Ohio Department of Agriculture, is making steady progress towards the elimination of this destructive tree pest from the United States.

“We want to remind the public that program officials are going door-to-door conducting tree inspections in areas quarantined for the beetle,” said Josie Ryan, APHIS’ ALB Eradication Program national operations manager. “You can help us by allowing our program officials access to the trees on your property.” Continue reading

Southern pine beetles becoming a problem in Mississippi

In Delta Farm Press

Mississippi is having a breakout of tiny beetles that use pheromones to gather sufficient numbers of reinforcements to overwhelm healthy trees.

Current Mississippi Forestry Commission flyovers indicate nearly 5,000 separate Southern pine bark beetle outbreaks across the state. Outbreaks can range from just a few trees to more than an acre of infested and dying pines. Continue reading

Forest Farming Intensive for all levels

Organic Growers School, in partnership with the Appalachian Beginning Forest Farmers Coalition and Warren Wilson College, is pleased to host a two-day Forest Farming Intensive for farmers, and forest landowners of all skill levels in Appalachia and beyond who are interesting in starting, expanding, or diversifying a forest farming operation. The event will be held at Warren Wilson College in Swannanoa, NC on September 30th & October 1st, 2017. Continue reading

Exotic Forest Pest Educator Position Available Immediately

Purdue University’s Department of Entomology is seeking a creative individual to serve as Exotic Forest Pest Educator.  This individual will develop Indiana’s Forest Pest Outreach Survey & Program to educate citizen scientists about invasive species and how to report them.

Requirements include a Bachelor’s degree in Entomology, Forest Entomology, Urban Forestry, Horticulture, Wildlife, Environmental Science and Technology, Technical Writing, Speech Communication or related field; and at least two years’ experience working with invasive species, the horticultural industry, pests of forests or trees, or in some field of technical mass media communication.  Continue reading

Emerald ash borer is in Charlotte, NC

in the Charlotte Observer

by Bruce Henderson

An invasive insect that has killed millions of ash trees across the U.S. has arrived in Charlotte, a city official said Tuesday.

The emerald ash borer was first detected in North Carolina in 2013 after invading most other eastern states. It was a matter of time before the metallic green beetle appeared in Charlotte, experts told the Observer earlier this spring. Continue reading