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    The Southern Region IPM Center is located at North Carolina State University, 1730 Varsity Drive, Suite 110, Raleigh, NC 27606, and is sponsored by the United States Department of Agriculture, National Institute of Food and Agriculture.
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The Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) Regulated Area Expands in Kansas to include Atchison County

Effective immediately, the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) is adding Atchison County in Kansas to the list of regulated areas for the emerald ash borer (EAB). APHIS is taking this action in response to the detection of EAB in Atchison County.

To prevent the spread of EAB to other states, the attached Federal Order outlines specific conditions for the interstate movement of EAB-regulated articles from the quarantined areas in Kansas. Specifically, the interstate movement of EAB-host wood and wood products from the quarantined areas in Kansas is regulated, including firewood of all hardwood species, nursery stock, green lumber, waste, compost, and chips of ash species. Continue reading

The People Have Spoken: Using Forest and Firewood National Polling Data to Promote Forest Health

This webinar will discuss results from a national survey of citizen attitudes toward invasive species, firewood movement, and forest health. This webinar is jointly sponsored by the SREF Forest Health and Invasive Species Program and the Firewood Outreach Coordinating Initiative.

This webinar is scheduled for Jan 25, 2017 1:00 pm US/Eastern. Continue reading

Invasive insects turn forests into wasteland

by Michael Casey and Patrick Whittle, Associated Press

In a towering forest of centuries-old eastern hemlocks, it’s easy to miss one of the tree’s nemeses. No larger than a speck of pepper, the Hemlock woolly adelgid spends its life on the underside of needles sucking sap, eventually killing the tree.

The bug is one in an expanding army of insects draining the life out of forests from New England to the West Coast. Aided by global trade, a warming climate and drought-weakened trees, the invaders have become one of the greatest threats to biodiversity in the United States. Continue reading

Want to help in the fight against emerald ash borer? Here’s what you need to know

Emerald ash borer (EAB), an exotic invasive from Asia, has infested 24 states and 2 Canadian provinces. It was discovered in Michigan in 2001, but scientists believe it had been in the country since the early 1990s. Because ash is one of the most common tree genera in North America, the pest’s prolific nature and fatal impact on trees make it the most economically and ecologically costly forest insect to invade North America. The information below is meant to help you understand more about EAB and be able to help slow its spread.

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Western NC wages battle against pests

From the Asheville Citizen-Times

Ten years ago, before the effects of the woolly adelgid were seen in Western North Carolina, forests were lush with majestic hemlock trees.

Today, in the blink of an eye in geological time, millions of the evergreen trees have been lost from Alabama to Maine, victims of the tiny insect from Japan that has found a favorable climate.

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Research indicates new hosts for two major plant diseases

The Plant Management Network highlights two research projects this month that have uncovered new possible hosts for two deadly forest diseases: laurel wilt and Phytophthora ramorum.

Vectored by the redbay ambrosia beetle, laurel wilt attacks species in the Lauraceae family, causing death within a few years. Recently, scientists tested Persea indica, a tree species native to the Madeira and Canary Islands, for its attractiveness to the redbay ambrosia beetle. The beetle preferred P. indica over Persea borbonia (redbay), its primary host in the U.S.

Continue reading