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  • Funded by USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture

    The Southern Region IPM Center is located at North Carolina State University, 1730 Varsity Drive, Suite 110, Raleigh, NC 27606, and is sponsored by the United States Department of Agriculture, National Institute of Food and Agriculture.
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UK IPM School coming up

by Katie Pratt, University of Kentucky

The 2017 Integrated Pest Management Training School is Wednesday, March 1, at the University of Kentucky Research and Education Center in Princeton.

Speakers include specialists and agents with the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food and Environment and the UK Cooperative Extension Service. Continue reading

Assess your disease and nematode management program this fall

In Southeast Farm Press

Bob Kemerait, University of Georgia Plant Pathologist

“What exactly is it you do?” I am asked time and again.  “I am a plant pathologist for the University of Georgia,” I say, which is met with a blank stare until I say, “That is like being a veterinarian for plants.”

In truth, “a veterinarian for plants” may not be the best description. Plant pathologists are less able to heal a single affected plant than they are to protect an entire crop.  I have begun to think of my vocation as more of a “zookeeper,” which is a better moniker for corralling and containing a host of wild beasts like fungi, bacteria, nematodes and viruses.  When these beasts escape, for they are truly cunning, it is my job to work with farmers, Extension agents, consultants, researchers and agricultural industry to put them back in their cages as quickly as possible. Continue reading

Distinguishing Diseases from Chemical Injury in Soybean

Author: Heather Marie Kelly, Extension Plant Pathologist, University of Tennessee

Soybean diseases and chemical injury can be difficult to correctly diagnose in the field. Some general information about diseases in soybean and common chemical injury follow to help distinguish between the two. Continue reading

Keep a watch out for foliar diseases this summer

In Delta Farm Press

A wet planting season pushed some growers to get soybeans and other crops in the ground.

And if excessive rainfall continues, farmers should be prepared for the threat of more mid- and late-summer disease pressure, says a University of Arkansas Extension plant pathologist.

Continue reading

Tennessee Extension plant pathologist tackles fungicide-resistant frogeye leaf spot, receives regional award

Frogeye leaf spot has always been a bane for soybean growers, but its recent resistance to fungicides has made it even more burdensome. So University of Tennessee Extension Plant Pathologist Heather Kelly has dedicated herself to learning more about the disease so that she can develop more effective control options and teach farmers how to use them. Her willingness to tackle the problem as a relatively new faculty member at UT caught the attention of her colleagues and earned her a Friends of Southern IPM Future Leader award, which she received on March 11 at the Southern Soybean Disease Working Group meeting in Pensacola, FL.

Continue reading

Cool, wet conditions create good environment for crops, diseases

From Delta Farm Press

This has been one of the coolest summers in recent memory for residents of the South and Southeast. Instead of breaking into a sweat moments after you walk outside, farmers and others who work outdoors have been able to stay reasonably calm, cool and collected.

Continue reading

First sighting of soybean rust on U.S. crop made in Alabama

In Southeast Farm Press

The first U.S. sighting of soybean rust on soybeans for the current growing season was made this week in a sentinel plot in central Alabama’s Autauga County.

The disease was detected in a soybean sentinel plot in Prattville in Autauga County on Aug. 3. According to Ed Sikora, Auburn University Extension plant pathologist, the soybeans were at the R5 growth stage with 100 percent canopy closure. Incidence of soybean rust within the plot was less than 1 percent. The disease was previously reported on kudzu in Baldwin County, near the Alabama Gulf Coast.

Continue reading