APHIS Prohibits the Importation of Pomegranate Arils from Peru into the United States due to Mediterranean Fruit Fly (Ceratitis capitata)

Effective immediately, the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) prohibits the importation of pomegranate arils from Peru into the United States. APHIS is taking this action in response to two detections of Mediterranean fruit fly (Medfly) larvae in commercial shipments of pomegranate arils from Peru.

Prior to this Federal Order, pomegranate arils were commercially enterable into the United States with inspection at the first port of entry. In May 2018, Customs and Border Protection Agriculture Specialists at Los Angeles International Airport detected Medfly larvae in two commercial consignments of pomegranate arils from Peru. Due to the pest risk, APHIS has determined that prohibition of pomegranate arils from Peru is immediately necessary to prevent the entry of Medfly into the United States, pending an investigation and appropriate remedial measures. This prohibition applies to both commercial shipments and passenger baggage. This prohibition does not affect the commercial importation of whole pomegranate fruit from Peru, which remain enterable with treatment. Continue reading

Fruit flies pose food safety risk

Fruit flies have long been a source of annoyance for restaurant, foodservice and food processing operators. But now, new research shows that these tiny pests can play a more sinister role: spreading illness-inducing bacterial pathogens to food and food preparation surfaces.

The study, conducted by scientists at Ecolab, the leading provider of pest elimination solutions to the foodservice, food processing and food retail industries, was recently published in the Journal of Food Protection *. The study found evidence of fruit flies’ ability to transfer harmful bacteria from a contaminated source to surfaces or ready-to-eat food. Fruit flies are present in more than half of foodservice facilities, according to data collected by Ecolab’s field team, which provides both comprehensive and localized treatment options for small flies. Continue reading

New AgriLife Extension fact sheet gives buzz on indoor flies

By: Paul Schattenberg, Texas A&M AgriLife

It’s getting close to fly season again and a new Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service publication will help people identify different types of indoor flies, understand their biology and, most importantly, learn how to eliminate them.

“Next to ants, flies may be the most common household pest problem,” said Dr. Mike Merchant, AgriLife Extension entomologist in Dallas. Merchant is the author of the new six-page fact sheet “Indoor Flies and Their Control,” which provides pictures, descriptions and behavioral details on the most common indoor flies. Continue reading

Removal of Oriental Fruit Fly (Bactrocera dorsalis) Quarantine Area in Redland, Miami-Dade County, Florida

Effective February 13, 2016, the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) removed the Redland area of Miami-Dade County as an Oriental fruit fly (OFF) quarantine area. As a result, Florida does not have any active fruit fly quarantines. Continue reading

Oriental fruit fly is in Miami-Dade County

In Southeast Farm Press

Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services has positively identified more than 40 Oriental fruit flies in Miami-Dade County. This species is considered one of the most serious of the world’s fruit fly pests due to its potential economic harm.

The initial fly was discovered during routine trapping, and additional flies were discovered during expanded trapping activities. The department, along with the U.S. Department of Agriculture, monitors more than 56,000 fruit fly traps throughout Florida as an early detection network against exotic fruit fly introductions that threaten Florida’s agriculture industry.

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Experts recommend ways to deal with spotted wing drosophila

In Growing Produce

It’s just a fruit fly, for crying out loud. As kids we’d see their like hovering over the family fruit bowl and shoo them away without a thought. But spotted wing drosophila (SWD), Drosophila suzukii, is so much more than that.

Though small like their nonthreatening drosophila relatives — adults are only about 1/16 to 1/8 inch long — it’s the black spot towards the tip of each male’s wing, which earns them the spotted wing moniker.

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