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  • Funded by USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture

    The Southern Region IPM Center is located at North Carolina State University, 1730 Varsity Drive, Suite 110, Raleigh, NC 27606, and is sponsored by the United States Department of Agriculture, National Institute of Food and Agriculture.
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New Resources Available for Tawny Crazy Ant Management

A working group focusing on the tawny crazy ant is developing materials to help people identify and manage this pest.

First funded in 2015, the Tawny Crazy Ant Working Group used a 2017 IPM Enhancement grant to create videos, conference booth materials and booklets with information about the ant. Continue reading

Video: Challenges in School IPM

Growers and consultants on the farm typically use integrated pest management to save money and prevent unneeded pesticide applications. In schools, however, IPM is seen as “extra” expenses and work. As Auburn University Extension Specialist Lawrence C. “Fudd” Graham explains, school IPM is an ongoing challenge in every state, including in those that have active laws.

School IPM videoIn this video of his presentation to the Southern IPM Center Advisory Council, Dr. Graham explains how pest management in a school differs from pest management on a farm. In schools, he says, IPM is successful only if staff, administration, teachers and students contribute. And when schools are well-maintained and clean, pest complaints decrease and food safety ratings increase. Continue reading

Got fire ants? This eXtension site can help

Article written by Mike Merchant, Texas A&M Agrilife Extension Entomologist, in his blog Insects in the City

Fire ants remain the most prevalent outdoor ant pest in most areas of the southern U.S.  Throughout the U.S. we estimate the annual cost of fire ant control at over $6 billion.  But the cost of this pest goes far beyond measurable dollars.  Fire ants reduce the recreational value of our parks and backyards, disrupt wildlife populations, and send thousands to emergency rooms each year from their painful stings.

Continue reading