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Elemental sulfur linked to breathing problems

in Morning AgClips

Elemental sulfur, the most heavily-used pesticide in California, may harm the respiratory health of children living near farms that use the pesticide, according to new research led by UC Berkeley.

In a study of children in the agricultural community of Salinas Valley, California, researchers found significant associations between elemental sulfur use and poorer respiratory health. The study linked reduced lung function, more asthma-related symptoms and higher asthma medication use in children living about a half-mile or less from recent elemental sulfur applications compared to unexposed children. Continue reading

Options discussed for farmers battling cotton root rot

by Blair Fannin, Texas A&M AgriLife

Cotton root rot disease continues to be a major threat to Texas cotton, but there are options available to farmers to fend off potential threats or lessen the potential economic hardship, according to a Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service plant pathologist in College Station.

Dr. Tom Isakeit gave an update on cotton root rot research at the recent Blackland Income Growth Conference in Waco. Continue reading

Leaf spot disease a major problem for Georgia peanut growers

by Kyle Dawson, University of Georgia

Georgia peanut growers are experiencing problematic leaf spot diseases this year due to susceptible varieties and weakening fungicide treatments, according to Albert Culbreath and Tim Brenneman, plant pathologists at the University of Georgia Tifton Campus.

Brenneman said this year’s dry conditions should have set up an environment that’s less favorable for leaf spot. Continue reading

Tomato spotted wilt virus has not been put “to bed”

In Southeast Farm Press

by Bob Kemerait, University of Georgia

Peanut growers hoped tomato spotted wilt virus was a thing of the past. New, improved varieties with TSWV resistance along with other better management tools finally put the disease “to bed.” But tomato spotted wilt virus will not stay down.

Once a disease that threatened the peanut industry in the Southeast, tomato spotted wilt had been on the decline since 2005 and was nearly nonexistent in peanut fields between 2009 and 2012.

Continue reading

North Carolina growers express concern about diseases and pigweed

In Southeast Farm Press

The importance of disease management to maximize corn yields and ongoing concern about Palmer amaranth topped discussion at the 2015 Northeast Ag Expo Field Day in Shiloh, N.C. July 30.

Traveling south from Virginia, Hillary Mehl, Extension crops plant pathologist at Virginia Tech, stressed the importance of knowing the relative resistance or susceptibility to diseases of each corn variety selected. Through it all, farmers must be aware of the disease they are looking for, which is why scouting is critical, Mehl emphasized.

Continue reading

Know the weed before you apply a herbicide

From Southwest Farm Press

The easiest way to control weeds in peanuts, or any other crop, is to keep them from getting started in the first place.

“Prevention is the cheapest form of weed control,” says Todd Baughman, Oklahoma State University Extension agronomist, who discussed weed control issues at the Oklahoma Peanut Expo in Lone Wolf, Okla.

Continue reading

Early disease and nematode control key to crop management

In Southwest Farm Press

Jason Woodward covered a lot of ground in a short time — in less than an hour he touched on several cotton disease issues, discussed new options for controlling nematodes and offered some variety selection points.

The recent Red River Crops Conference in Childress, Texas, in its second year and sponsored by the Texas and Oklahoma Extension services, offered a full two days of timely information on crop production, legislation, and market outlooks.

Continue reading