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New app from University of Missouri identifies herbicide injury

In Delta Farm Press

University of Missouri Extension introduced a new mobile app to identify herbicide injury at its annual Pest Management Field Day on July 10.

MU Extension weed specialist Mandy Bish says Herbicide Injury ID lets users send photos of injured plants to MU Extension for preliminary diagnosis and feedback. Users can also scroll through a library of more than 200 photos to look for similar types of damage.

Read the rest of the story in Delta Farm Press.

Engineered cotton uses weed-suppression chemical as nutrient

by Kay Ledbetter, Texas A&M AgriLife

A newly developed fertilizer system will provide nutrition to engineered cotton crops worldwide and a deadly dose to weeds that are increasingly herbicide resistant, according to a Texas A&M AgriLife Research study.

The new system applies phosphite to cotton crops engineered to express a certain gene — a gene that makes cotton able to process the phosphite into nutrition while the same compound suppresses weeds that are unable to use it, researchers said. Continue reading

Pesticide Resistance Needs Attention, Large-Scale Study

To slow the evolutionary progression of weeds and insect pests gaining resistance to herbicides and pesticides, policymakers should provide resources for large-scale, landscape-level studies of a number of promising but untested approaches for slowing pest evolution. Such landscape studies are now more feasible because of new genomic and technological innovations that could be used to compare the efficacy of strategies for preventing weed and insect resistance.

That’s the takeaway recommendation from a North Carolina State University review paper addressing pesticide resistance published today in the journal Science. Continue reading

Kansas State researchers discover how plants develop glyphosate resistance quickly

Kansas State University researchers have discovered how weeds develop resistance to the popular herbicide glyphosate, a finding that could have broad future implications in agriculture and many other industries.

Their work is detailed in an article that appears in the March 12 edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, known as PNAS and considered to be one of the most-cited journals for scientific research in the world. According to its website, PNAS receives more than 21 million hits per month. Continue reading

Resistance management still important even with new herbicides

In Southeast Farm Press

by Brad Haire

Herbicide-resistant weeds didn’t fall from the sky or rise from fields in a mutant mutiny, but they are here nonetheless. With new herbicide technologies going mainstream this season, growers must continue dogged resistant-weed management programs to preserve viable chemistries for as long as possible.

“In general, herbicide-resistant weeds become a problem over time when they are selected to survive by the overuse of a single herbicide or single mode of action. In all weed populations, there are very low levels or frequencies of herbicide-resistant plants in comparison to susceptible plants,” said Eric Prostko, University of Georgia Extension weed specialist during an American Society of Agronomy webinar “Growing for Tomorrow: How Weed Resistance Management Can Lead to Sustainability” Feb. 1 sponsored by BASF. Continue reading

New software to control pigweeds

NOTE: One of the PDs on this project, Muthu Bagavathiannan, will be conducting a webinar on use of this software next Wednesday, February 15, at 3 PM Eastern time. To find out more information, or to register, click this link.

This article was originally in Delta Farm Press.

As Mid-South pigweeds continue to be stubborn and hard to control, methods to combat them are expanding. In mid-January, the University of Arkansas released a software package (http://bit.ly/2kBMIwn) to assist growers in making informed decisions managing Palmer amaranth.

“It’s a unique software tool in that you can select whether you have glyphosate resistance, ALS resistance, or PPO resistance,” says Jason Norsworthy, weed scientist.  “From there, you devise potential herbicide management strategies over a 10-year period. We’re very proud of the program.” Continue reading

Webinar: PAM: a bioeconomic decision-support tool for guiding the management of Palmer amaranth

Herbicide resistance in Palmer amaranth (known as Palmer pigweed) is a serious issue in the Southern US and is spreading to several other states. Repeated use of a few herbicide mechanisms of action (MOA) without sufficient management diversity is the common cause of this resistance. A proactive resistance management strategy that integrates diverse chemical and non-chemical tools will help prevent/manage resistance and preserve the utility of available herbicide options.

This webinar provides a general overview and demonstration of a new Microsoft-Excel based decision support tool that guides informed decision making for effective management of this weed, with particular focus on soil seedbank management and profitability. Users can build their own management programs and see for themselves how effective their pigweed management program is, as well as overall economic outcomes associated with their options. This tool also predicts the likely risk of resistance for the management program built by the user. Continue reading