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    The Southern Region IPM Center is located at North Carolina State University, 1730 Varsity Drive, Suite 110, Raleigh, NC 27606, and is sponsored by the United States Department of Agriculture, National Institute of Food and Agriculture.
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Scientists find time of day makes a difference with some herbicides

In Southeast Farm Press

What if a cotton producer needed to spray early in the morning or late in the afternoon or at night? Does the time of day a herbicide is applied make a difference in how well it works? A group of weed specialists studied this and what they found surprised them.

The group included scientists from the University of Georgia, Louisiana State University, Mississippi State University, North Carolina State University and the University of Tennessee. Continue reading

If your weed control is working, it’s time to change it, says weed scientist

in Delta Farm Press

It might seem like an odd recommendation to make – to change something if it’s working.

But that’s what Bob Scott, Extension weed scientist with the University of Arkansas System Division of Agriculture, said during a presentation at Pigposium 3, held at East Arkansas Community College in Forrest City. Continue reading

Scientific Advisory Panel Report for Glyphosate Available

The Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act Scientific Advisory Panel (SAP) met December 13-16, 2016, to consider a set of scientific issues being evaluated by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regarding EPA’s evaluation of the carcinogenic potential of the herbicide glyphosate. The meeting minutes and final report from the meeting are now available.

The minutes and final report can be found on the FIFRA SAP web site (https://www.epa.gov/sap) and in the OPP Docket # EPA-HQ-OPP-2016-0385 (https://www.regulations.gov). EPA will review this document as well as other comments before making a final determination regarding the potential carcinogenicity of glyphosate. Continue reading

Options to address ryegrass for warm-season forage production

by Adam Russell, Texas A&M AgriLife

Producers hoping to mitigate annual ryegrass growth for warm-season hay production have options and should start sooner than later, said a Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service expert.

Annual ryegrass, a cool-season forage, is often utilized by livestock producers for winter grazing, said Dr. Vanessa Corriher-Olson, AgriLife Extension forage specialist, Overton. However, East Texas hay producers often view it as an unwanted species that competes with Bermuda and Bahia grasses, she said. Continue reading

EPA Amends Registration for Enlist Duo Herbicide to Add GE Cotton and Additional States

Enlist Duo, a formula containing the choline salt of 2,4-D and glyphosate for use in controlling weeds in genetically engineered (GE) crops, was first registered in 2014 for use in GE corn and soybean crops. The Environmental Protection Agency is amending the registration to include GE cotton and expand the use to an additional 19 states for GE corn, soybean, and cotton and re-affirming our original decision before the remand.

EPA did a comprehensive review for the initial registration of Enlist Duo and now again in response to the application to amend the registration. EPA’s protective and conservative human health and ecological risk assessments re-confirmed our 2014 safety findings. The pesticide meets the safety standard for the public, agricultural workers, and non-target plants and animal species, including a “no effects” determination for species listed as threatened or endangered under the Endangered Species Act. Continue reading

How to avoid herbicide resistance in weeds

In Delta Farm Press

by Bob Scott, University of Arkansas

Weed scientists at the University of Arkansas System Division of Agriculture have created quite a stir with news that through experimentation in the greenhouse, researchers selected for a population of pigweed — Palmer amaranth — that is tolerant to the herbicide dicamba at a field rate. This pigweed population did not evolve resistance in the field, but there is much we can learn from the artificial selection that took place in the greenhouse.

The researchers exposed three generations of pigweed to sub-lethal doses of dicamba, a recipe for resistance development. We started with pigweed collected from the field that was susceptible to dicamba. By the third generation, we were able to select for seedlings capable of surviving an application at one-time rate that should’ve provided effective control. Continue reading

Pesticide toxicity to bees can vary by product and dose

In Delta Farm Press

There’s no denying that insecticides and honey bees can be a toxic mix. Bees, after all, are insects and insecticides are designed to kill insects. But they can vary greatly in their toxicity to bees, depending on the type and the dosage.

That’s one of the findings of a study being conducted by entomologists at the USDA-Agricultural Research Service’s Jamie Whitten Delta States Research Center and Mississippi State University’s Delta Research and Extension Center, both in Stoneville, Miss. Continue reading