University of Vermont study shows GMO labeling decreases opposition to GMO foods

A recent study at the University of Vermont found that labeling on genetically-modified products actually improved consumer perceptions of genetic engineering.

Labeling of genetically–modified products has been controversial since the concept was introduced. In 2016, several states introduced bills to label genetically modified food products. Many states included an initiative on the voting ballot, and despite the seeming demand for labeling based on surveys, in most states the initiatives did not receive the popular vote. Vermont, on the other hand, passed a law to label genetically-modified foods on July 1, 2016 without presenting it for a popular vote. Continue reading

GMO bill passes in the Senate

From Science

By Dianne Lugo

The U.S. Senate has passed, by a vote of 63 to 30, a bill that would create a national standard for labeling food made with genetically modified organisms (GMOs). Yesterday’s vote marks a win for food companies, farm groups, and biotech firms, which have been pushing the federal government to set a single national standard in hopes of heading off a patchwork of state labeling laws, such as one that went into effect in Vermont on 1 July. But GMO critics say the bill fails to adequately protect consumers who want to know if a product contains GM ingredients.

Senator Patrick Leahy (D–VT) spoke against the bill during yesterday’s debate, describing it as “a farce of a proposal.” He argued that “with the swift speed with which the proponents of this bill have moved, with no committee process, no debate or amendment process, we will not be able to ensure the language in this bill does exactly what they say that it does. Just take their word for it.” Continue reading