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  • Funded by USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture

    The Southern Region IPM Center is located at North Carolina State University, 1730 Varsity Drive, Suite 110, Raleigh, NC 27606, and is sponsored by the United States Department of Agriculture, National Institute of Food and Agriculture.
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New pesticide-free technologies help replace methyl bromide in greenhouses

Steam and heat technology and plastic trays have provided greenhouse tobacco growers with an effective and relatively inexpensive alternative to methyl bromide.

According to a story in Southeast Farm Press, greenhouse owners have finally ceased use of the fumigant methyl bromide, used for disease and weed prevention. However, EPA banned the use of methyl bromide several years ago and organized a gradual phaseout to allow growers and researchers time to find useful alternatives that would not cut into grower profits. Continue reading

SARE has new fact sheet on sustainable pest management in greenhouses

Growers using greenhouses in which temperature, light and relative humidity are controlled have relied for many years on releases of natural enemies to manage aphids, thrips and two-spotted spider mites. However, many of the natural enemies used to manage these pests in heated structures are too sensitive to swings in air temperature and relative humidity to be used in cool structures such as minimally heated greenhouses and unheated high tunnels.

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Fact sheet on biological control in greenhouses and high tunnels

Having trouble with pests in your greenhouses and high tunnels? Interested in learning more about using biological control to manage them? Read SARE’s new fact sheet, Sustainable Pest Management in Greenhouses and High Tunnels, to learn how beneficial insects can protect crops in season-extending structures and enhance the sustainability of your operation.

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