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  • Funded by USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture

    The Southern Region IPM Center is located at North Carolina State University, 1730 Varsity Drive, Suite 110, Raleigh, NC 27606, and is sponsored by the United States Department of Agriculture, National Institute of Food and Agriculture.
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New biopesticide available for bollworm and budworm crop pests

A host-specific virus is being used to control bollworms and budworms in Arkansas crops.

Helicoverpa nuclearopolyhedrovirus, or just NPV, does not affect humans, plants or other insects, including beneficials. Continue reading

Kudzu bugs move toward Arkansas soybeans

In Delta Farm Press

by Ryan McGeeney, University of Arkansas Division of Agriculture

After almost five years of waiting, the inevitable has finally arrived: Kudzu bugs have made their way across the Delta, into Arkansas, and are poised to begin affecting soybeans in the fall.

The pest, which overwinters in kudzu, was first detected in Arkansas in 2013, mostly in small numbers. Robert Goodson, Phillips County agricultural agent for the University of Arkansas System Division of Agriculture, said that only within recent weeks had the pest been discovered in large numbers in a commercial soybean field near Helena, Ark. Continue reading

2014 Friends of Southern IPM Winners

Two graduate students and five seasoned IPM professional individuals or groups will receive recognition for being Friends of Southern IPM this year. This year’s contest yielded competition in every category that received nominations. 

Continue reading

Don’t spray wheat crop just yet, says Arkansas entomologist

From Delta Farm Press

Yes, those are stink bugs in your wheat field. No, you probably shouldn’t start spraying just yet.

That’s the assessment of Gus Lorenz, Extension entomologist for the University of Arkansas.

After weeks of significant rain and mud, “I guess it got dry enough to walk some fields today,” Lorenz said. “My phone was ringing off the wall with calls, mostly about stink bugs in wheat.”

Continue reading