Register for the Spray Drift Management Webinar

On March 15, 2018, at 11:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. ET, EPA will offer a Strategies for Managing Pesticide Spray Drift Webinar. This webinar is tailored for growers, pesticide applicators, and other interested stakeholders who work with pesticides and pesticide application equipment.

Pesticide spray drift is the movement of pesticide dust or droplets through the air — at the time of application or soon after — to any site other than the area intended. Spray drift can affect people’s health, damage nearby crops, and pose a risk to non-target organisms. This webinar will focus on strategies for reducing pesticide spray drift. Continue reading

Hit the Target website a tool for producers on both sides of auxin training

by Kay Ledbetter, Texas A&M AgriLife

While cotton and soybean producers across Texas are getting the do’s and don’ts for applying new chemical formulations to their crop, the education is being extended to producers with sensitive or susceptible crops to protect their investments.

Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service personnel have more than 70 meetings planned to train producers on working with the new auxin herbicide technology in cotton and soybeans as a part of label requirements, said Dr. Scott Nolte, AgriLife Extension state weed specialist in College Station. Continue reading

Training is required for dicamba use

In Southeast Farm Press

In October 2017, the Environmental Protection Agency approved revised labeling for new formulations of dicamba products that are marketed as Engenia (BASF), Xtendimax (Monsanto), and FeXapan (DuPont).

These new herbicides were developed in conjunction with the release of dicamba-tolerant soybean (Roundup Ready2 Xtend soybean varieties).  All three products, which were first available for applications during the 2017 growing season, are now classified by the EPA as “RESTRICTED USE” pesticides, meaning that either a commercial or private pesticide certification license must be held by individuals who purchase and apply these products. Continue reading

Weed scientists says temperature inversions responsible for large acreage dicamba damage

In Delta Farm Press

by Ford Baldwin, weed scientist consultant

Continuing with excerpts from my testimony before the Arkansas Joint Agriculture, Forestry and Economic Development Committee meeting on dicamba, I will focus on what is required to get a large acreage or a landscape effect from a herbicide.

This effect occurred in the high use areas in west Tennessee, northeast Arkansas, the Mississippi Delta, and the Missouri Bootheel. It is much different than what is happening in areas or states where less dicamba is being applied. In these high use areas, about two to three weeks after the drift and volatility patterns that I described appeared, the bomb went off — both in 2016 and to a much greater extent in 2017. Continue reading

Missouri uses weather stations to help farmers avoid off-target applications

by Linda Geist

Nine Missouri weather stations recently received updates to help farmers and chemical applicators know when to spray herbicides to avoid off-target movement caused by temperature inversions.

The University of Missouri Extension Commercial Agriculture Program operates 24 real-time weather stations throughout the state. The Missouri Soybean Merchandising Council recently funded updates for stations in Monroe City, Vandalia, Albany, Columbia, Green Ridge, Hayward, Lamar, Linneus and Mountain Grove. Continue reading

Temperature inversion and herbicide applications

The following tips were presented in a Delta Farm Press article related to the dicamba drift debate. Because some herbicide labels include instructions about not applying during a temperature inversion, I am including the tips below. You can read the entire article in Delta Farm Press.

Here are eight things about temperature inversion based on University of Missouri research you should know now. Continue reading

More precautions needed when spraying with dicamba and 2,4-D

From the Weed Science Society of America

New resistant soybean and cotton cropping systems based on the synthetic auxin herbicides give farmers new options for managing Palmer amaranth and other broadleaf weeds resistant to glyphosate. But scientists with the Weed Science Society of America (WSSA) say special precautions are necessary. Auxin herbicides are known to drift and to cause harm to sensitive, off-target broadleaf plants.

“Concerns about drift led the U.S. EPA to issue time-limited registrations for the auxin herbicides dicamba and 2,4-D of two years and five years respectively,” says Kevin Bradley, Ph.D., past president of WSSA and associate professor at the University of Missouri. “The approved product labels have considerable detail on management of drift and other risks and must be carefully followed to reduce off site movement. Unless growers show they can use these herbicides as labeled, the registrations could easily be revoked.” Continue reading