Growers must be careful when using new herbicide technologies

In Delta Farm Press

Rules surrounding new weed-fighting technologies don’t make for a short, or uncomplicated, list, says Ples Spradley.

First off, “Applications of products (Xtendimax, Enlist Duo and Engenia) shall not be made to Enlist or Xtend seed technologies without’” completing new training, the Arkansas Extension pesticide safety education specialist told the crowd at the recent Pigposium 3 in Forrest City, Ark. “If you’re an applicator – private, commercial, non-commercial or commercial applicator technician – and will use those herbicides on those technologies, you must go through our training. The new regulations state that you cannot apply Xtendimax in Arkansas between April 15 and September 15, with a limited exception for pasture applications.” Continue reading

What do farmers think about resistant weeds?

in Southeast Farm Press

Both scientists and regulators have had a lot to say about the growing problem of herbicide resistance and how weed management techniques need to change in response. However, there have been few organized opportunities for farmers to make their voices heard and to share their experiences in managing herbicide-resistant weeds.

This is changing with a series of seven regional listening sessions sponsored by the Weed Science Society of America, the United Soybean Board and the U.S. Department of Agriculture Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service. Farmers across the nation are being invited to share their challenges, successes and opinions. Continue reading

Diversity is necessary in weed control

in Southwest Farm Press

South Texas, or coastal Texas, is a unique region of the greater Southwest, marked by a sub-tropical climate, unique soils and a host of both advantages and disadvantages when it comes to agriculture.

The warmer climate allows for an extended growing season, and its relationship with the tropical Gulf of Mexico offers some clear advantages, like seasonal rains, but also unique challenges, not the least of which is an environment conducive to the rapid growth and propagation of noxious and damaging weed varieties. Continue reading

Tomorrow at 3 PM ET: Learn about a pigweed decision management tool

Herbicide resistance in Palmer amaranth (known as Palmer pigweed) is a serious issue in the Southern US and is spreading to several other states. Repeated use of a few herbicide mechanisms of action (MOA) without sufficient management diversity is the common cause of this resistance. A proactive resistance management strategy that integrates diverse chemical and non-chemical tools will help prevent/manage resistance and preserve the utility of available herbicide options.

This webinar provides a general overview and demonstration of a new Microsoft-Excel based decision support tool that guides informed decision making for effective management of this weed, with particular focus on soil seedbank management and profitability. Users can build their own management programs and see for themselves how effective their pigweed management program is, as well as overall economic outcomes associated with their options. This tool also predicts the likely risk of resistance for the management program built by the user.

Date and time: Wednesday, February 15, at 3 PM Eastern time Continue reading

Resistance management still important even with new herbicides

In Southeast Farm Press

by Brad Haire

Herbicide-resistant weeds didn’t fall from the sky or rise from fields in a mutant mutiny, but they are here nonetheless. With new herbicide technologies going mainstream this season, growers must continue dogged resistant-weed management programs to preserve viable chemistries for as long as possible.

“In general, herbicide-resistant weeds become a problem over time when they are selected to survive by the overuse of a single herbicide or single mode of action. In all weed populations, there are very low levels or frequencies of herbicide-resistant plants in comparison to susceptible plants,” said Eric Prostko, University of Georgia Extension weed specialist during an American Society of Agronomy webinar “Growing for Tomorrow: How Weed Resistance Management Can Lead to Sustainability” Feb. 1 sponsored by BASF. Continue reading

New software to control pigweeds

NOTE: One of the PDs on this project, Muthu Bagavathiannan, will be conducting a webinar on use of this software next Wednesday, February 15, at 3 PM Eastern time. To find out more information, or to register, click this link.

This article was originally in Delta Farm Press.

As Mid-South pigweeds continue to be stubborn and hard to control, methods to combat them are expanding. In mid-January, the University of Arkansas released a software package (http://bit.ly/2kBMIwn) to assist growers in making informed decisions managing Palmer amaranth.

“It’s a unique software tool in that you can select whether you have glyphosate resistance, ALS resistance, or PPO resistance,” says Jason Norsworthy, weed scientist.  “From there, you devise potential herbicide management strategies over a 10-year period. We’re very proud of the program.” Continue reading

New technology must be used with good stewardship

In Southwest Farm Press

The old saw, “Those who do not learn history are doomed to repeat it,” attributed to George Santayana, should be made into a bumper sticker and slapped onto the side of every spray rig in the cotton belt as a constant reminder that overuse of new chemistry will shorten its useful life.

Overuse of Roundup Ready technology resulted in what Todd Baughman, Oklahoma State University Extension agronomist, refers to as Public enemy No. 1: herbicide-resistant pigweed. Continue reading