High Plains sorghum outlook outlined by AgriLife Extension specialists

by Kay Ledbetter, Texas A&M AgriLife

Producers may be concerned about planting sorghum this season, but several Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service specialists said there are ways to prepare for upcoming issues and be profitable.

During the Interstate 40 Sorghum Luncheon recently in Amarillo, producers heard the latest on managing sugarcane aphids, weed control and how it all figures into the bottom line as producers manage crop budgets and pricing strategies. Continue reading

Online database can help diagnose herbicide injury

In Delta Farm Press

Agriculture professionals and homeowners now have an online reference if they suspect their plants have sustained injury from herbicides.

The new Herbicide Injury Database at https://plants.uaex.edu/herbicide/default.aspx, contains more than 1,000 images collected across two decades showing and cross-referencing herbicides and the types of damage to many types of plants. Continue reading

Keep pesticide drift at bay

by Clint Thompson, University of Georgia

As a result of two years of aggressive training to improve on-target agricultural pesticide applications, the number of pesticide drift complaints received by University of Georgia Cooperative Extension has gone down 65 percent, according to UGA Extension weed specialist Stanley Culpepper.

“No grower wants (their pesticides to) drift. I’ve said it a million times. The best way for Extension to help our growers eliminate drift is by providing them the latest research data on tactics and approaches they can implement to help them achieve their goal,” Culpepper said. Continue reading

Growers must be careful when using new herbicide technologies

In Delta Farm Press

Rules surrounding new weed-fighting technologies don’t make for a short, or uncomplicated, list, says Ples Spradley.

First off, “Applications of products (Xtendimax, Enlist Duo and Engenia) shall not be made to Enlist or Xtend seed technologies without’” completing new training, the Arkansas Extension pesticide safety education specialist told the crowd at the recent Pigposium 3 in Forrest City, Ark. “If you’re an applicator – private, commercial, non-commercial or commercial applicator technician – and will use those herbicides on those technologies, you must go through our training. The new regulations state that you cannot apply Xtendimax in Arkansas between April 15 and September 15, with a limited exception for pasture applications.” Continue reading

What do farmers think about resistant weeds?

in Southeast Farm Press

Both scientists and regulators have had a lot to say about the growing problem of herbicide resistance and how weed management techniques need to change in response. However, there have been few organized opportunities for farmers to make their voices heard and to share their experiences in managing herbicide-resistant weeds.

This is changing with a series of seven regional listening sessions sponsored by the Weed Science Society of America, the United Soybean Board and the U.S. Department of Agriculture Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service. Farmers across the nation are being invited to share their challenges, successes and opinions. Continue reading

Protect trees when applying herbicides to weeds

by Merritt Melancon, University of Georgia

It can take years for a tree to reach full maturity, but it only takes one or two seasons of damage to irreparably harm the biggest and most expensive piece of a well-designed landscape.

Drought, insects and blight can all cause damage to mature trees. But more often than not, when a mature tree takes a turn for the worse, the culprit may be human error. Continue reading

Options to address ryegrass for warm-season forage production

by Adam Russell, Texas A&M AgriLife

Producers hoping to mitigate annual ryegrass growth for warm-season hay production have options and should start sooner than later, said a Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service expert.

Annual ryegrass, a cool-season forage, is often utilized by livestock producers for winter grazing, said Dr. Vanessa Corriher-Olson, AgriLife Extension forage specialist, Overton. However, East Texas hay producers often view it as an unwanted species that competes with Bermuda and Bahia grasses, she said. Continue reading