Protect trees when applying herbicides to weeds

by Merritt Melancon, University of Georgia

It can take years for a tree to reach full maturity, but it only takes one or two seasons of damage to irreparably harm the biggest and most expensive piece of a well-designed landscape.

Drought, insects and blight can all cause damage to mature trees. But more often than not, when a mature tree takes a turn for the worse, the culprit may be human error. Continue reading

Options to address ryegrass for warm-season forage production

by Adam Russell, Texas A&M AgriLife

Producers hoping to mitigate annual ryegrass growth for warm-season hay production have options and should start sooner than later, said a Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service expert.

Annual ryegrass, a cool-season forage, is often utilized by livestock producers for winter grazing, said Dr. Vanessa Corriher-Olson, AgriLife Extension forage specialist, Overton. However, East Texas hay producers often view it as an unwanted species that competes with Bermuda and Bahia grasses, she said. Continue reading

Flag the Technology helps farmers identify herbicide sensitive fields

by Blair Fannin, Texas A&M AgriLife

The Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service and the Texas Plant Protection Association have collaborated on a Flag the Technology program that identifies crop fields sensitive to certain herbicides.

With two new herbicide resistance technologies which will be widely used in cotton, corn and soybeans, program coordinators say it is critical farmers know which fields are safe for application of the new products and which are sensitive to them. Continue reading

EPA Amends Registration for Enlist Duo Herbicide to Add GE Cotton and Additional States

Enlist Duo, a formula containing the choline salt of 2,4-D and glyphosate for use in controlling weeds in genetically engineered (GE) crops, was first registered in 2014 for use in GE corn and soybean crops. The Environmental Protection Agency is amending the registration to include GE cotton and expand the use to an additional 19 states for GE corn, soybean, and cotton and re-affirming our original decision before the remand.

EPA did a comprehensive review for the initial registration of Enlist Duo and now again in response to the application to amend the registration. EPA’s protective and conservative human health and ecological risk assessments re-confirmed our 2014 safety findings. The pesticide meets the safety standard for the public, agricultural workers, and non-target plants and animal species, including a “no effects” determination for species listed as threatened or endangered under the Endangered Species Act. Continue reading

Pasture management program to be held in Texas

by Adam Russell, Texas A&M AgriLife

The Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service will hold an East Texas Pasture Management Program Feb. 17 in Overton.

The program begins with registration at 12:30 p.m. at the Texas A&M AgriLife Research and Extension Center, 1710 N. Farm-to-Market Road 3053.

Cost is $25 per person if preregistered by Feb. 15 or $35 the day of the event. Register online at https://agriliferegister.tamu.edu or call AgriLife Extension Conference Services at 979-845-2604. Continue reading

Texas workshop focuses on pest control and water quality

by Kathleen Phillips, Texas A&M AgriLife

A five-hour continuing education event will be offered Dec. 8 at the Jackson County Services Building auditorium, 411 N. Wells, Edna.

The event, from 9 a.m.-3 p.m., is hosted by the Field Crops and Beef committees of the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service’s Jackson County office, according to Michael Hiller, AgriLife Extension agent. Continue reading

EPA Registers Dicamba Formulation for Use on Dicamba Tolerant Crops

EPA is registering a dicamba formulation, Xtendimax™ with Vapor Grip™ Technology, which is specifically designed to have lower volatility, to control weeds in cotton and soybean crops genetically engineered to tolerate dicamba.

This registration is for a formulation of dicamba that contains an additive that reduces volatility. This formulation is different from the products that are alleged to have been recently used illegally. EPA continues to investigate these issues in several locations in the Midwest. Continue reading