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  • Funded by USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture

    The Southern Region IPM Center is located at North Carolina State University, 1730 Varsity Drive, Suite 110, Raleigh, NC 27606, and is sponsored by the United States Department of Agriculture, National Institute of Food and Agriculture.
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Cover crops help with weeds in high tunnels

by Candice Pollock-Moore, Southern SARE

Barley and hairy vetch growing vigorously in a high tunnel at Lola’s Organic Farm in southeast Georgia were going to seed. It was mid-April. Time to mow and prepare the soil for the summer’s cash crops: ginger and turmeric.

Since last year, couple Jennifer Taylor and Ron Gilmore – USDA certified organic farmers – have been playing around with growing cover crops in high tunnels, following the positive results of a Southern Sustainable Agriculture Research & Education (SSARE)-funded Producer Grant project that showed cover crops grown in the field ahead of a cash crop can suppress weeds and build soil health. Continue reading

NC Farm School Summit – Practical Production Practices for Successful Farms

The NC Farm School Summit is coming to western North Carolina to celebrate is 3rd year in bringing NC Farm School graduates together from across the state. NC Cooperative Extension Agents from several western counties are hosting anyone who is interested in gaining understanding of specific production practices. This will be an exciting two-day event for farmers interested in gaining knowledge in production. Continue reading

SARE Funding in Your State

Since 1988, SARE has awarded $245 million for more than 6,100 research and education initiatives led by innovative farmers, ranchers, researchers and educators who are committed to improving agriculture’s profitability, stewardship and quality of life.

SARE Grants Funded in Your State. Continue reading

Basics of Construction and Crop Production for High Tunnels

High Tunnels allow growers to extend the growing season and increase profitability.  If you are interested in learning more about building high tunnels and using them in crop production, please join Clemson University for a more in depth look at the opportunities high tunnels can provide.

In the afternoon on October 25th we will tour working high tunnels at the Clemson Coastal Research and Education Center and see over 20 varieties of plants currently in production there.  Clemson Extension agent Zack Snipes will be on hand to lead the tour and answer questions.  Continue reading

Alabama researchers find pest exclusion system that allows for natural enemies

by Ayanava Majumdar, Alabama Cooperative Extension System

The concept of High Tunnel Pest Exclusion (HTPE) system has been explained in many other articles listed at the end. Basically, pest exclusion is a feasible IPM strategy where a sturdy structure can be modified with fabric to serve as a barrier between insect pests and host plants. HTPE can be very an effective strategy for organic and conventional high tunnel producers that aim at preventing insect pests. However, the HTPE system raises questions about the unintended consequences of this technology, such as the exclusion of natural enemies. With this in mind, we conducted laboratory-based assays to evaluate natural enemy exclusion using HTPE models fitted with 30, 40, and 50 percent shade cloths sold by Poly-Tex (MN), Grainger (IL), Green-Tek (WI), and Farmtek (IA). HTPE models were covered in glass cages during the tests. Farmtek shade cloths have fine openings (knitted monofilament) whereas the shade cloths from other vendors have wide (v-shaped) openings.  Continue reading

AgriLife Extension part of three year nearly $250,000 grant

In Southwest Farm Press

by Steve Byrnes

A passion for helping limited-resource strawberry producers become successful has again paid off for a team headed by a Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service horticulturist at Lubbock.

Dr. Russ Wallace was notified in late February that the project, “Evaluating Organic Pest Control Products for Strawberries in Combination with High and Low Tunnels for Limited Resource Farmers in the Mid-South” was awarded $246,413 for research and education purposes from Southern Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education. Continue reading

SARE has new fact sheet on sustainable pest management in greenhouses

Growers using greenhouses in which temperature, light and relative humidity are controlled have relied for many years on releases of natural enemies to manage aphids, thrips and two-spotted spider mites. However, many of the natural enemies used to manage these pests in heated structures are too sensitive to swings in air temperature and relative humidity to be used in cool structures such as minimally heated greenhouses and unheated high tunnels.

Continue reading