USDA pollinator study examines forage quality

In Delta Farm Press

USDA’s Economic Research Service conducted a literature review of the effects of land use on pollinator health and examined the trends in pollinator forage quality over the last 30 years. Continue reading

New Texas A&M AgriLife sweetclover variety – Silver River Sweetclover – paradise for pollinators

by Adam Russell, Texas A&M AgriLife

Donning his beekeeper suit, Charles Touchstone, of Arapaho, Oklahoma, stepped a few feet inside a buzzing 90-acre field of Silver River Sweetclover planted for seed production near Taloga, Oklahoma. Some of the lacy white flowered shoots busy with bees stretched above his 6-foot frame.

Silver River Sweetclover is a new Texas A&M variety available through Turner Seed Co. in Breckenridge, and Justin Seed Co. in Justin. The variety was developed through cooperative efforts by researchers at Texas A&M AgriLife Research and Extension centers in Overton, Beeville and Uvalde with the help of Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service specialists in College Station. Continue reading

Lab and Apiary Research Associate at EPA

The EPA Environmental Research and Business Support Program has an immediate opening for a Lab and Apiary Research Associate with the Office of Research and Development at the EPA’s Research Triangle facility in Raleigh-Durham, NC.

The Cardiopulmonary and Immunotoxicology Branch (CIB) of the Environmental Public Health Division (EPHD) provides expertise in the conduct of toxicology studies that assess the impact of environmental exposures on the cardiopulmonary and immune systems of healthy animals and animal models of susceptibility.  Continue reading

West Texas bees doubt groundhog’s extended winter prediction

by Steve Byrnes, Texas A&M AgriLife

SPLAT! West Texas honey bees are on the move, so motorists shouldn’t be surprised if their windshields are strafed by a hapless swarm in coming weeks, said a Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service entomologist.

Dr. Charles Allen, of San Angelo, said the unusually warm February, touted as the warmest on record here, has put honey bees in the mood to travel. Continue reading

Seattle resident opens “Pollinator Pathways” for native pollinators

In the Atlantic

The campus of Seattle University, just east of the city center, is famous for its gardens, many of them filled with plants native to the Pacific Northwest. There is a tea garden, two rain gardens, a wildlife garden, and a community garden. There is an ethnobotanic garden, a biodiversity garden, and a garden dedicated to the remembrance of local Japanese-Americans interned during World War II. One open lawn, bordered with trees, is known simply as “Thinking Field.” Continue reading

Ten policies to benefit pollinators

Several pollinator experts from around the globe contributed to a document relating to recommended government policies for pollinators. The suggestions include several insights stated in a document published by the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES) last year. Authors recommend ten policies that would support and benefit pollinator populations. Continue reading

Experts to present webinar series on crop pollination

The majority of U.S. specialty crop growers depend on bees for pollination of their crops. Growers know that without adequate pollination, they would not be profitable. But what are the best pollination strategies for fruit, vegetable, and nut crops? What farm management practices can growers use to support bees and the crop pollination they provide? Experts in crop pollination working under the Integrated Crop Pollination Project will present on these topics and will report on their recent research in this project as part of a webinar series titled: Ensuring crop pollination in US specialty crops. The webinar series will examine the role of wild bees, honey bees and other managed bees in supporting crop pollination and yield in almond, blueberry, tree fruit, pumpkin, and watermelon.  Continue reading