Build native bee nesting sites to attract pollinating bees to your landscape

By Josh Fuder, University of Georgia

When most people think about bees, honeybees and their hives of hexagonal, wax honeycombs come to mind. Unlike most bees, honeybees are social insects. Only 6 percent of bee species are social.

There are approximately 4,000 species of native bees in North America and 542 species live in Georgia. Native bees nest in the ground or in cavities, like hollow stems or bored holes in wood. According to the Xerces Society, only 250 female orchard mason bees are required to pollinate an acre of apples. This same task would typically require 15,000 to 20,000 forager honeybees. Continue reading

NC State study finds Triangle bees can’t stand the heat

In the News and Observer

On a hot summer day, urban areas of the Triangle can be up to five degrees warmer than surrounding rural locations, and the temperature gap grows after the sun sets, as acres of pavement, concrete and steel emit heat absorbed during the day.

The phenomenon is known as the “urban heat island” effect, and a recent N.C. State University study shows that many of North Carolina’s native bee species keep away from hot, urban areas. The study also offers a glimpse at how bees might be affected by rising temperatures due to climate change. Continue reading

USDA pollinator study examines forage quality

In Delta Farm Press

USDA’s Economic Research Service conducted a literature review of the effects of land use on pollinator health and examined the trends in pollinator forage quality over the last 30 years. Continue reading

New Texas A&M AgriLife sweetclover variety – Silver River Sweetclover – paradise for pollinators

by Adam Russell, Texas A&M AgriLife

Donning his beekeeper suit, Charles Touchstone, of Arapaho, Oklahoma, stepped a few feet inside a buzzing 90-acre field of Silver River Sweetclover planted for seed production near Taloga, Oklahoma. Some of the lacy white flowered shoots busy with bees stretched above his 6-foot frame.

Silver River Sweetclover is a new Texas A&M variety available through Turner Seed Co. in Breckenridge, and Justin Seed Co. in Justin. The variety was developed through cooperative efforts by researchers at Texas A&M AgriLife Research and Extension centers in Overton, Beeville and Uvalde with the help of Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service specialists in College Station. Continue reading

Lab and Apiary Research Associate at EPA

The EPA Environmental Research and Business Support Program has an immediate opening for a Lab and Apiary Research Associate with the Office of Research and Development at the EPA’s Research Triangle facility in Raleigh-Durham, NC.

The Cardiopulmonary and Immunotoxicology Branch (CIB) of the Environmental Public Health Division (EPHD) provides expertise in the conduct of toxicology studies that assess the impact of environmental exposures on the cardiopulmonary and immune systems of healthy animals and animal models of susceptibility.  Continue reading

West Texas bees doubt groundhog’s extended winter prediction

by Steve Byrnes, Texas A&M AgriLife

SPLAT! West Texas honey bees are on the move, so motorists shouldn’t be surprised if their windshields are strafed by a hapless swarm in coming weeks, said a Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service entomologist.

Dr. Charles Allen, of San Angelo, said the unusually warm February, touted as the warmest on record here, has put honey bees in the mood to travel. Continue reading

Seattle resident opens “Pollinator Pathways” for native pollinators

In the Atlantic

The campus of Seattle University, just east of the city center, is famous for its gardens, many of them filled with plants native to the Pacific Northwest. There is a tea garden, two rain gardens, a wildlife garden, and a community garden. There is an ethnobotanic garden, a biodiversity garden, and a garden dedicated to the remembrance of local Japanese-Americans interned during World War II. One open lawn, bordered with trees, is known simply as “Thinking Field.” Continue reading