FDA Issues Final Guidance Clarifying FDA and EPA Jurisdiction over Mosquito-Related Products

Today, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) finalized guidance to provide information on FDA and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) jurisdiction over the regulation of mosquito-related products intended to function as pesticides, including those produced through the use of biotechnology.

Read more: https://www.fda.gov/AnimalVeterinary/NewsEvents/CVMUpdates/ucm578420.htm

Charles Parker honored for boll weevil eradication

In Southwest Farm Press

The idea that you could eradicate the boll weevil from an area as large as the eastern U.S. Cotton Belt is breathtaking in its scope. That many farmers from so many diverse regions of the country had never worked together before.

Today the boll weevil has basically been pushed back across the border into Mexico, thanks, in large measure, to the work of the National Cotton Council’s Boll Weevil Action Committee. The group was first chaired by Marshall Grant, a cotton producer from North Carolina and then by Charles Parker, producer from Senath, Mo. Continue reading

The war on the boll weevil

by Dominic Reisig, NC State University

In NC State University News

The boll weevil (Anthonomus grandis) is not much to look at – just a grayish, little beetle with an impressively long snout. But this particular beetle, and its hunger for cotton, was powerful enough to forge an unprecedented partnership between farmers, legislators and scientists. And that partnership showed how much can be accomplished when scientists and farmers work together.

What adult boll weevils lack in size they make up for with their larvae’s ability to feed on and destroy cotton. Boll weevils entered the U.S. from Mexico in the late 1800s, when they were first spotted in Texas. By the 1920s they had spread through all of the major cotton-producing areas in the country. The scope of the damage was breathtaking, as were the control efforts thrown at this insect: at one time, one-third of the insecticide used in the U.S. was used to combat boll weevils. Continue reading

Webinar: Mitigating Potential Impacts of Neonicotinoid Insecticides on Wetland Ecosystems

What will you learn?

Participants will learn about opportunities to mitigate for potential risks of neonicotinoid insecticides to aquatic systems. Learn more…

Presented by USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service – Science and Technology Continue reading

EPA review of pyrethroids

The Environmental Protection Agency is in the process of reviewing some of the older, broad-spectrum classes of insecticides. The comment period is now open for the preliminary ecological risk assessment of pyrethroids. The EPA is really looking to hear from people that use these products responsibly. The below link provides a tool to make comments on EPA dockets without looking up each product individually. It also includes the type of information that is most helpful and a template to follow if so desired. Comments from growers will be much appreciated.

https://www.votervoice.net/PWG/campaigns/48706/respond

Social media saves on insecticides

by Katie Pratt, University of Kentucky

A University of Kentucky entomologist is using a social media platform to help producers cut down on unnecessary insecticide applications.

Ric Bessin started the Facebook page Swdinky to help growers monitor and potentially treat for the spotted wing drosophila, a fruit fly that can destroy soft-skinned, small fruit including grapes, raspberries, blueberries, blackberries and strawberries. The invasive insect first appeared in Kentucky in 2012. It overwinters in the state, but when it becomes active varies by year. Continue reading

IPM and Organic Moving Forward Together

This article is from Northeastern IPM Insights

by Chris Gonzales and Steve Young, Northeastern IPM Center

As a discipline, agriculture has a need for resources to support research, education, Extension, and technology transfer. Within the field of crop production and protection, IPM and organic are no different. Yet, their basic philosophy—which places an emphasis on the environment, human health, and profitability—sets them apart from other approaches. It has been said that if you can’t beat ’em, join ’em. IPM and organic communities have definitely not been beaten, but they are not growing as rapidly as they could be, considering the increased demand in the marketplace. The USDA’s Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education (SARE) program has funded and supported more projects in both IPM and organic than any other government agency. Perhaps their success is in their name, “sustainable agriculture.” Is it time to re-assess and re-label both IPM and organic as ecologically-based? Continue reading