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  • Funded by USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture

    The Southern Region IPM Center is located at North Carolina State University, 1730 Varsity Drive, Suite 110, Raleigh, NC 27606, and is sponsored by the United States Department of Agriculture, National Institute of Food and Agriculture.
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NIFA Invests $4.1 Million in IPM Regional Coordination for Crop Protection and Pest Management

USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture recently awarded four Regional Coordination Program Area grants to provide an Integrated Pest Management Center (IPMC) in each region of the United States. IPMCs increase regional and national coordination of integrated pest management research and extension efforts that address priority pest issues impacting agricultural production, natural resources, and urban areas. IPMCs facilitate local and regional collaboration across states and disciplines to promote the development and adoption of integrated pest management practices through information networks, team building, broad-based stakeholder participation, and enhancement seed grants. These awards are a part of NIFA’s Crop Protection and Pest Management Program.

Understanding Cycles of Pests and Diseases and Their Interaction with the Environment

For farmers, successful use of cultural disease and insect pest management methods to prevent and/or avoid problems before they occur depends on an understanding of pathogen and pest life cycles and also how their development may be affected by weather conditions.  In this workshop, vegetable disease and insect pest management experts will discuss life cycles of key disease pathogens and insect pests affecting vegetables both above and below-ground. They will also explain how growers may use this information to implement certain cultural management practices that help to prevent or avoid disease and pest problems, and how changes in weather can affect disease and pest development. The workshop will conclude with a session on selection and application of organic insecticides for use in vegetables. Continue reading

Job opportunity: Western IPM Center Director

The Western Integrated Pest Management Center is seeking a new Director. The Western Integrated Pest Management Center (WIPMC) Director within the UC Statewide IPM Program will provide overall leadership of WIPMC, with responsibility for its successful management and operations, including supervision of all WIPMC staff, and will collaborate with a wide range of stakeholders to identify regional IPM objectives and formulate strategies to address important IPM issues. Please click here for the full job description and to apply.

This position is headquartered in Davis, California (Yolo County) Continue reading

Register Now for the Integrated Pest Management Pollinator Habitat Promotion Webinar

The Environmental Protection Agency is offering a free webinar titled “Integrated Pest Management: Strategies for Pollinator Habitat Promotion and Conservation in Agricultural Areas” on August 28, 2018, from 1 –2:30 pm ET. This webinar is tailored for growers, pesticide applicators, agricultural land managers, and other interested stakeholders who work in crop production.

Our presenter will be Dr. Allan Felsot, professor and extension specialist from Washington State University. The presentation will cover land management topics such as cultural management practices, bio-economics, and integrated insect and weed management.  Continue reading

Remembering Former Western IPM Center Director Rick Melnicoe

From IPM West

by Steve Elliott, Western IPM Center

Rick Melnicoe was a fixture in Western agriculture for decades.

As the regional coordinator of the specialty crop pesticide program known as IR-4, or the director of the Western Pesticide Impact Assessment Program, or the founding director of the Western Integrated Pest Management Center, Rick met with, worked with, ran with and influenced a lot of people. Continue reading

NCSU Transition Team for Methyl Bromide helps growers maintain yields while improving the ozone layer

A group of extension specialists at NC State University have helped growers use integrated pest management to transition away from a toxic fumigant while maintaining their yields. Decreased use of the fumigant has had positive environmental consequences as well: the decreased use has led to lower bromine levels in the atmosphere, accounting for one-third of the measured decrease in ozone depleting halogens above the Antarctica.

The transition away from the pesticide methyl bromide began in 2005, in response to scientific data linking it to decreasing ozone levels in the atmosphere. Developed countries banned methyl bromide under the Montreal Protocol, an international treaty signed in 1987 to protect the stratospheric ozone layer. In the United States, the USDA National Institute for Food and Agriculture devised a funding mechanism to help scientists gradually wean farmers away from methyl bromide use. Each year, scientists would apply for “critical use exemptions” to specify how much methyl bromide they felt farmers in their state would need while they searched for alternatives. The funding mechanism was called the “Methyl Bromide Alternatives Program.” Continue reading

New Texas A&M AgriLife facility trains pest control pros

by Gabe Saldana, Texas A&M AgriLife

A new training facility for pest management professionals has opened its doors at the Texas A&M AgriLife Research and Extension Center, Dallas, where entomologists converted a graduate student dormitory into what they now call “ground zero for pest control training in Texas.”

The facility is called IPM Experience House after the science-based approach to pest control known as integrated pest management. Continue reading