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    The Southern Region IPM Center is located at North Carolina State University, 1730 Varsity Drive, Suite 110, Raleigh, NC 27606, and is sponsored by the United States Department of Agriculture, National Institute of Food and Agriculture.
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Emerald ash borer is in Charlotte, NC

in the Charlotte Observer

by Bruce Henderson

An invasive insect that has killed millions of ash trees across the U.S. has arrived in Charlotte, a city official said Tuesday.

The emerald ash borer was first detected in North Carolina in 2013 after invading most other eastern states. It was a matter of time before the metallic green beetle appeared in Charlotte, experts told the Observer earlier this spring. Continue reading

Emerald ash borer causing problems in North Carolina

On the WUNC web page

by Elizabeth Friend

North Carolina is one of the states hardest hit by invasive forest pests, according to a report from the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies.

Part of the problem is global trade is bringing new insects and diseases that are devastating native trees, said Gary Lovett, the study’s lead author. Continue reading

Postdoc opportunity at University of Florida

Are you a recent graduate or postdoc interested in invasive species, nature conservation, invasive pest prevention, regulation and policy? Are you good at interview-type research? Do you have a good record of academic publishing?

The Emerging Threats to Forests research group at the University of Florida’s School of Forest Resources and Conservation in collaboration with the USDA Forest Service is looking for a postdoc or a temporary researcher on a project “Review of successful eradications of invasive forest pests and diseases”.

Continue reading