New Spotted Lanternfly Working Group meeting in July

Spotted lanternfly is a new invasive pest recently detected in southeastern Pennsylvania that feeds voraciously on many hosts, including grapes, hops, tree fruit, trees, and ornamentals.

The first Spotted Lanternfly Working Group meeting will be held July 16-17, 2018, at Albright College, Reading, PA. Continue reading

Natural enemy suppresses kudzu bug population

By Julie Jernigan, University of Georgia

A tiny wasp — known as “Paratelenomus saccharalis” — is cutting down kudzu bug populations and Georgia soybean farmers’ need to treat for the pest, according to Michael Toews, a University of Georgia entomologist based on the UGA Tifton campus.

The wasp, an egg parasitoid and natural enemy of the kudzu bug, is saving soybean farmers time and money. Continue reading

Tree researchers gather in Lexington to share work in saving native trees

By Carol Lea Spence, University of Kentucky

Every day, American forests, both rural and urban, fight for their health against invasive species and pests. Scientists around the country are working diligently to protect and restore some iconic native species. Many of those scientific partners will gather in Lexington in mid-July to share their research findings.

The public also is welcome to come hear about their progress during a free, public seminar, Forests of the Future, 7 p.m. EDT July 11 at the Fayette County Extension office, 1140 Harry Sykes Way, Lexington. Continue reading

Pepper weevil is the new big threat to vegetables

In Southeast Farm Press

by Clint Thompson, University of Georgia

Pepper weevils are such a threat to Georgia’s pepper crop that University of Georgia vegetable entomologist David Riley says Georgia farmers and agricultural workers should immediately kill any weevils found on fruit, equipment or clothes.

This year’s cold winter temperatures helped to wipe out fall vegetable plants like peppers and eggplants that host the weevils. However, weevils can hitchhike on peppers that the U.S. imports from Mexico and infect Georgia’s pepper fields. Seventy percent of the winter peppers imported into the U.S. are grown in Mexico, where pepper weevils originate. Continue reading

Florida working group takes a big bite out of conehead termites

An invasive termite in southeastern Florida is losing its grip on the area, thanks to successful eradication efforts by a multi-agency working group.

Sue Alspach, an environmental specialist with the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (FDACS), used funding from a Southern Integrated Pest Management Center IPM Enhancement grant to gather experts from many agencies in Florida to form a working group to deal with the pest. Continue reading

Eradication Program Announces 2018 Plans for Fighting the Asian Longhorned Beetle

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) is announcing 2018 Asian longhorned beetle (ALB) eradication plans. APHIS, together with the New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets, the Massachusetts Department of Conservation and Recreation, and the Ohio Department of Agriculture, is making steady progress towards the elimination of this destructive tree pest from the United States.

“We want to remind the public that program officials are going door-to-door conducting tree inspections in areas quarantined for the beetle,” said Josie Ryan, APHIS’ ALB Eradication Program national operations manager. “You can help us by allowing our program officials access to the trees on your property.” Continue reading

Invasive Insects of Shade Trees: A 30 Year Perspective from Colorado

Dr. Whitney Cranshaw will discuss the ever-changing cast of new and invasive tree insects that have become issues in the Rocky Mountain States over the past 30 years.

Speaker: Whitney Cranshaw, Professor, Extension Specialist, CSU

Date: Wednesday, May 2, 2018

Time: 12 pm (MST)

REGISTER GET CEUS Continue reading