Sugarcane aphids spreading throughout the Texas Panhandle

by Kay Ledbetter, Texas A&M AgriLife

While sugarcane aphid populations are still low in grain sorghum fields across the Texas High Plains, a Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service specialist in Amarillo said they are beginning to establish and could reach treatable numbers.

Dr. Ed Bynum, AgriLife Extension entomologist, said sugarcane aphid populations in the South Plains only recently reached economic levels in some fields that justified treatment with insecticides. Infestations in the field can be just a few aphids per plant to a thousand or more aphids per plant. Continue reading

Assistant Cooperative Extension Specialist

Integrated Management of Invasive and Endemic Arthropods Attacking Subtropical Fruit Crops University of California, Riverside

The Department of Entomology invites applications for an Assistant Cooperative Extension Specialist in the area of integrated management of invasive and endemic arthropod species attacking subtropical fruit crops at the University of California, Riverside. This is a fiscal year position and is available January 1, 2018 with a 90 % Cooperative Extension/10% Organized Research appointment in the Agricultural Experiment Station (http://cnas.ucr.edu/about/aes/). The position will be housed at the University of California Riverside Campus in Riverside, CA. Continue reading

Webinar: Drought and Invasive Species

This webinar is presented by SREF & Forest Service Office of Sustainability and Climate.

What will you learn?

Drought creates the potential for invasive plant species to increase in diversity and abundance in a variety of ecosystems, often mediated by the occurrence of disturbances (wildfire, insect outbreaks). Learn more… Continue reading

The Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) Regulated Area Expands in Kansas to include Atchison County

Effective immediately, the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) is adding Atchison County in Kansas to the list of regulated areas for the emerald ash borer (EAB). APHIS is taking this action in response to the detection of EAB in Atchison County.

To prevent the spread of EAB to other states, the attached Federal Order outlines specific conditions for the interstate movement of EAB-regulated articles from the quarantined areas in Kansas. Specifically, the interstate movement of EAB-host wood and wood products from the quarantined areas in Kansas is regulated, including firewood of all hardwood species, nursery stock, green lumber, waste, compost, and chips of ash species. Continue reading

Resistance breeding for evergreens is beginning to yield results

by Dee Shore, NC State University

At the Mountain Research Station in Waynesville, N.C., postdoctoral researcher Ben Smith patiently tends thousands of evergreen seedlings. His goal: to find at least a few that will tolerate two tiny but troublesome pests.

Part of NC State University’s Department of Entomology and Plant Pathology, Smith works for the nonprofit Forest Restoration Alliance. His experiments have implications not only for important area industries but also for the fate of forests threatened by invasive insects. Continue reading

Invasive insects turn forests into wasteland

by Michael Casey and Patrick Whittle, Associated Press

In a towering forest of centuries-old eastern hemlocks, it’s easy to miss one of the tree’s nemeses. No larger than a speck of pepper, the Hemlock woolly adelgid spends its life on the underside of needles sucking sap, eventually killing the tree.

The bug is one in an expanding army of insects draining the life out of forests from New England to the West Coast. Aided by global trade, a warming climate and drought-weakened trees, the invaders have become one of the greatest threats to biodiversity in the United States. Continue reading

Surprise attack by redbanded stink bugs inspires new thresholds in Mississippi

by Bonnie Coblentz, MSU Extension Service

A game-changing insect caused significant problems in many Mississippi soybean acres, but good management allowed growers to finish the year with an average crop.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture estimated that by Oct. 23, Mississippi farmers were 92 percent finished harvesting the state’s soybean crop, which covered about 2.03 million acres this year. Insect and disease pressures made the effort challenging, but USDA predicts growers will harvest a state average of 48 bushels an acre. Continue reading