Getting the Best of Pests – Green Webinar Series – March 15, 2017

The University of Georgia’s Center for Urban Agriculture has developed an online, live, interactive training program that allows individuals to obtain re-certification credits from virtually anywhere. You will need a computer with internet access and speakers.
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The People Have Spoken: Using Forest and Firewood National Polling Data to Promote Forest Health

This webinar will discuss results from a national survey of citizen attitudes toward invasive species, firewood movement, and forest health. This webinar is jointly sponsored by the SREF Forest Health and Invasive Species Program and the Firewood Outreach Coordinating Initiative.

This webinar is scheduled for Jan 25, 2017 1:00 pm US/Eastern. Continue reading

Time-lapsed imaging may help growers detect citrus greening

in Southeast Farm Press

by Brad Buck, University of Florida

A time-lapse polarized imaging system may help citrus growers detect greening before the plant’s leaves show symptoms, which should help growers as they try to fend off the deadly disease.

For the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences study shows, Won Suk “Daniel” Lee and Alireza Pourreza wanted to know how early citrus leaves with greening can be detected while they are pre-symptomatic. So they inoculated plants with the greening disease and put those leaves through a time-lapse imaging system. Continue reading

Rio Grande Valley citrus growers vote whether to pool resources for pest management

by Rod Santa Ana, Texas AgriLife Extension

Rio Grande Valley citrus growers will vote this month on whether to pool their resources to battle invasive pests and diseases.

Brad Cowan, the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service agent in Hidalgo County, said growers will vote on setting up a management zone, approving a maximum assessment rate and electing growers to a board that will represent the management zone. Continue reading

How to check your trees for emerald ash borer

In Entomology Today

by Anand Persad, PhD

Urban treescapes are under attack. Seven billion ash trees, the dominant species of urban American canopies, are at risk of being destroyed by the invasive emerald ash borer (EAB) if not treated.

Since its first detection in Michigan in 2002, EAB has spread to 25 states and killed more than 50 million trees. Already, entire cityscapes have been destroyed. In a review published last year, scientists called it “the most destructive and economically costly forest insect to ever invade North America.” Continue reading

Postdoc opportunity at University of Florida

Are you a recent graduate or postdoc interested in invasive species, nature conservation, invasive pest prevention, regulation and policy? Are you good at interview-type research? Do you have a good record of academic publishing?

The Emerging Threats to Forests research group at the University of Florida’s School of Forest Resources and Conservation in collaboration with the USDA Forest Service is looking for a postdoc or a temporary researcher on a project “Review of successful eradications of invasive forest pests and diseases”.

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Invasive Plant, Pest and Disease Awareness Month Kicks Off

Big, creepy, and horned, the coconut rhinoceros beetle (CRB) loves to feed on—and kill—coconut and other palms, banana plants, and more.  This invasive species, detected in Hawaii in December 2013, makes the perfect poster child for USDA’s Invasive Plant Pest and Disease Awareness Month—a child only its mother could love.

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