Kudzu bugs’ decline is attributed to two factors

by Clint Thompson, University of Georgia

Once a devastating presence in Georgia’s soybean fields and a major nuisance to homeowners, the kudzu bug population has diminished over the past three years.

“Having kudzu bugs in your field isn’t the end of the world. It becomes problematic when you have too many of them,” said Ian Knight, a University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences graduate student. Continue reading

Eradication Program Announces 2017 Plans for Fighting the Asian Longhorned Beetle in New York, Massachusetts, and Ohio

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS), together with the New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets, the Massachusetts Department of Conservation and Recreation, and the Ohio Department of Agriculture, is announcing plans for the Asian longhorned beetle (ALB) eradication efforts taking place in 2017.  APHIS and its partners have been making steady progress towards the eradication of this destructive tree pest since its detection in New York in 1996.

“The goal is to eliminate this non-native, tree-killing pest, from the United States,” said Josie Ryan, APHIS’ national operations manager for the Asian Longhorned Beetle Eradication Program.  “We are confident that we can remove the beetle using the strategies we have available to us.” Continue reading

APHIS Adds Kane, Kendall, LaSalle, and Will Counties, Illinois, to the Gypsy Moth (Lymantria dispar) Regulated Area

Effective immediately, the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) is adding Kane, Kendall, LaSalle, and Will Counties in Illinois to the list of regulated areas for the gypsy moth (GM). The GM population in each of these counties has reached the threshold to trigger the regulated area.

To prevent the further spread of GM, the attached Federal Order establishes Kane, Kendall, LaSalle, and Will Counties in Illinois as regulated areas. Effective immediately, all interstate movement of GM-regulated articles from Kane, Kendall, LaSalle, and Will Counties must be handled in accordance with the attached Federal Order. Illinois has established a parallel state quarantine. Continue reading

A Tale of Two Buttercups

by Matt Poore, North Carolina State University

One of the signs of spring are the beautiful buttercups that adorn the roadsides, pastures and cropland. While to the casual viewer they really give a pretty yellow glow to the world in early spring, to an experienced forage manager they are clearly one of our most common and troublesome weeds.

Buttercups are non-native species that are very opportunistic at taking hold wherever there is bare ground in pastures. They are very common in hay feeding/sacrifice areas, around waterers, and everywhere in pastures that have been damaged due to animal impact during wet times, or due to overgrazing. The plants are very quick to set seed, so by the time you see the first yellow, there are literally only days left until they have set seed to provide for a good population the next year. So, if your pastures are really yellow each spring and you don’t do anything about it, it is unlikely that you will ever have much of a break from their impact. Continue reading

The Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) Regulated Area Expands in Minnesota to include Goodhue County

Effective immediately, the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) is adding Goodhue County in Minnesota to the list of regulated areas for the emerald ash borer (EAB). APHIS is taking this action in response to the detection of EAB in Goodhue County.

To prevent the spread of EAB to other states, the attached Federal Order outlines specific conditions for the interstate movement of EAB-regulated articles from the quarantined area in Minnesota. Specifically, the interstate movement of EAB-host wood and wood products from the quarantined areas in Minnesota is regulated, including firewood of all hardwood species, nursery stock, green lumber, waste, compost, and chips of ash species. Continue reading

Sugarcane aphids came early in Texas

in Southwest Farm Press

“Be careful what you wish for.” We have heard that phrase many times, in songs and poems, books and old adages, and probably from parents and teachers and a sibling or two. Its exact origin is unknown, but some credit an early 1800’s Goethe poem, others claim the old common saying is much older, some say younger.

Regardless its origin, however, nothing could be more true or fitting considering this year’s early spring in Deep South Texas. Farmers in the Lower Rio Grande Valley (LRGV) are finding the phrase particularly appropriate as they consider the good, the bad and the ugly of an early planting season this year. Continue reading

Webinar: Southern Pine Beetle Biology, Ecology, and Management

You are invited to attend the latest Live Webinar sponsored by: Southern Regional Extension Forestry / Forest Health and Invasive Species Program

Title: Southern Pine Beetle Biology, Ecology, and Management

What will you learn? 
This webinar will cover basic biology, ecology, and management of the southern pine beetle (SPB). While the focus of the webinar will be the southeastern U.S., attention will be given to the recent encroachment of SPB into the northeastern states. learn more here… Continue reading