Webinar: Targeting the triple threat, cheatgrass, medusahead, and ventenata: Ecological impacts, interactions & current management

These invasive annual grasses are devastating western natural areas and rangeland, resulting in landscape-scale transformations in a cycle that favors further invasion. Further Impacts include:

  • A continuous bed of fine fuel associated with an increase in frequency and intensity of rangeland wildfire
  • Significant reduction or elimination of desirable perennial species
  • Reduced forage quality for wildlife and livestock
  • Increased risks for wildlife and pollinator species
  • Resulting wildfires that are a threat to humans, wildlife, property, and infrastructure.

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Resistant varieties, beneficial predators can help producers win sugarcane aphid battle

by Kay Ledbetter, Texas A&M AgriLife

While sugarcane aphids have been difficult to suppress in past years due to their natural traits and limited insecticide options, a Texas A&M AgriLife Research study shows resistant sorghum varieties and beneficial predators could provide a solution.

Dr. Ada Szczepaniec, AgriLife Research entomologist at Amarillo, recently authored  “Interactive effects of crop variety, insecticide seed treatment, and planting date on population dynamics of sugarcane aphid and their predators in late-colonized sorghum” in the Crop Protection journal. The full article can be found at https://bit.ly/2IknvD4. Continue reading

Invasive Insects of Shade Trees: A 30 Year Perspective from Colorado

Dr. Whitney Cranshaw will discuss the ever-changing cast of new and invasive tree insects that have become issues in the Rocky Mountain States over the past 30 years.

Speaker: Whitney Cranshaw, Professor, Extension Specialist, CSU

Date: Wednesday, May 2, 2018

Time: 12 pm (MST)

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Don’t let fire ants ruin your summer, take steps this spring

by Adam Russell, Texas A&M AgriLife

Dealing with fire ants is no picnic, but getting rid of them can be as easy as Step 1, Step 2, according to Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service experts.

Dr. Allen Knutson, AgriLife Extension entomologist, Dallas, said spring is a good time to control fire ants as this is when they search for food and build mounds, which makes them easier to locate.  Continue reading

PhD position available

The Invasive Plant Science Lab at Utah State University in Logan, UT is seeking to fill a PhD position in cropping systems. The research will focus on the use of cover crops to address invasive plants in agronomic crops of the Intermountain and Western US. Funding has been secured from the Western IPM Center to support the project, which has the potential for expanding into a variety of crops and systems, including organic.

We seek candidates with: 1) strong quantitative and statistical skills, 2) demonstrated research excellence and 3) strong oral and written communication skills. Preference will be given to applicants whose research interests and expertise complement the research project but outstanding applicants looking to broaden their field of interest will also be seriously considered.

Send a letter of application, curriculum vitae, statement of research interests, and names and addresses of three references as email attachments (pdf or word formats) to Dr. Steve Young at steve.young@usu.edu. For earliest consideration, apply by May 1, 2018. Applications will be accepted until the position is filled. Utah State University is an Affirmative Action/Equal Employment Opportunity/ADA Employer.  

Trying to tame fire ants? Consider whether you want to eliminate the mounds or the ants

By Sharon Dowdy, University of Georgia

Fire ant research is not a hot topic in the scientific community because effective control products are available, but fire ants can kill people, so management of this pest remains an ongoing issue, according to Will Hudson, University of Georgia entomology professor.

“It’s a measure of the state of entomology. We used to have a fair amount of fire ant research going on in the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences,” said Hudson, who has studied the control of turf insects for the past 30 years. “But fire ants are still important because other ants aren’t going to kill you. If you are allergic and you get stung by a whole lot of fire ants, you could die.” Continue reading

National Invasive Species Week

February 26 through March 2 is National Invasive Species Week. Participate in events across the nation to raise awareness and identify solutions to invasive species issues at local, state, tribal, regional, international and national scales. Locate an invasive species event in your state or county. Plan your own event using the NISAW Toolkit – where and when it works for you.

Below is the schedule for activities in Washington, DC. If you plan on going to the events in DC, the organizers ask if you would participate in the Doodle Poll if you haven’t already. Continue reading