Woodland management is focus of UK forestry extension short course

by Carol Lea Spence, University of Kentucky

Kentucky forests are becoming fragmented, and landowners’ objectives are changing. Woodland owners who are wondering how to get the most from their property can benefit from attending one of three short courses being offered around the state this summer by the University of Kentucky Cooperative Extension Service.

Kentucky boasts nearly 12.5 million acres of forests. More than 300,000 families and individuals own fewer than 10 acres. Well-managed forests can provide extra income and recreational opportunities for their owners, as well as a beneficial environment for wildlife. The 2017 Woodland Owners Short Course will cover all those aspects for both novice and experienced landowners.
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Establishment of more invasive species a concern for UGA experts

By Sharon Dowdy, Clint Thompson, University of Georgia

Over the next 10 years, the number of cargo containers operating out of the Port of Savannah, Georgia, is expected to double. While additional cargo means increased revenue for the state, Chuck Bargeron, associate director of the University of Georgia Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health, is concerned it could also lead to the establishment of more invasive species.

The center has identified more than 2,900 different species of wildlife, plants and insects that are present in, but not native to, North America. Many of those species come from Asia, where the ships that deliver cargo to the Port of Savannah originate. Continue reading

University of Kentucky study combines outdoor exercise with tree health observations

by Katie Pratt, University of Kentucky

University of Kentucky researchers are looking for Lexingtonians interested in improving their health while gaining a greater awareness of their natural environment for a six-week research pilot project.

The project, titled “Healthy Trees-Healthy People,” gets participants out into two Lexington parks to walk and assess the health of selected trees. During the study, they will complete a daily log of their physical activity and tree health observations on designated trails at either Kirklevington Park or Harrods Hill Park. Depending on the park, routes are just under a half-mile and a mile. Continue reading

Experts estimate future sweetgum losses

Researchers at the University of Florida have estimated that sweetgum plantation owners could face $4.6 million in losses annually if a new pest of sweetgum from China arrives in the U.S. Read the story in Entomology Today.

Postdoctoral Scholar in aquatic plant weed control and restoration at UC Davis

The Gornish lab at the University of Arizona and the Grosholz lab at the University of California, Davis, seek a postdoctoral scholar to manage a weed control and restoration project fully funded by the California Delta Conservancy and the California Department of Water Resources, entitled ‘Investigations of restoration techniques that limit invasion of tidal wetlands.’ Continue reading

New National Pest Alert for Palmer Amaranth released

A new National Pest Alert for Palmer Amaranth has been released. This pest alert has been approved by the national leadership of USDA NRCS to address the recent problems with Palmer Amaranth seed inclusion in wildflower and pollinator seed mixes. Ultimately, decisions must be made at the local level to address the issue of Palmer amaranth in pollinator habitats, field edges and conservation plantings.

http://ncipmc.org/action/alerts/palmer.php

Emerald ash borer is in Charlotte, NC

in the Charlotte Observer

by Bruce Henderson

An invasive insect that has killed millions of ash trees across the U.S. has arrived in Charlotte, a city official said Tuesday.

The emerald ash borer was first detected in North Carolina in 2013 after invading most other eastern states. It was a matter of time before the metallic green beetle appeared in Charlotte, experts told the Observer earlier this spring. Continue reading