A Tale of Two Buttercups

by Matt Poore, North Carolina State University

One of the signs of spring are the beautiful buttercups that adorn the roadsides, pastures and cropland. While to the casual viewer they really give a pretty yellow glow to the world in early spring, to an experienced forage manager they are clearly one of our most common and troublesome weeds.

Buttercups are non-native species that are very opportunistic at taking hold wherever there is bare ground in pastures. They are very common in hay feeding/sacrifice areas, around waterers, and everywhere in pastures that have been damaged due to animal impact during wet times, or due to overgrazing. The plants are very quick to set seed, so by the time you see the first yellow, there are literally only days left until they have set seed to provide for a good population the next year. So, if your pastures are really yellow each spring and you don’t do anything about it, it is unlikely that you will ever have much of a break from their impact. Continue reading

The Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) Regulated Area Expands in Minnesota to include Goodhue County

Effective immediately, the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) is adding Goodhue County in Minnesota to the list of regulated areas for the emerald ash borer (EAB). APHIS is taking this action in response to the detection of EAB in Goodhue County.

To prevent the spread of EAB to other states, the attached Federal Order outlines specific conditions for the interstate movement of EAB-regulated articles from the quarantined area in Minnesota. Specifically, the interstate movement of EAB-host wood and wood products from the quarantined areas in Minnesota is regulated, including firewood of all hardwood species, nursery stock, green lumber, waste, compost, and chips of ash species. Continue reading

Sugarcane aphids came early in Texas

in Southwest Farm Press

“Be careful what you wish for.” We have heard that phrase many times, in songs and poems, books and old adages, and probably from parents and teachers and a sibling or two. Its exact origin is unknown, but some credit an early 1800’s Goethe poem, others claim the old common saying is much older, some say younger.

Regardless its origin, however, nothing could be more true or fitting considering this year’s early spring in Deep South Texas. Farmers in the Lower Rio Grande Valley (LRGV) are finding the phrase particularly appropriate as they consider the good, the bad and the ugly of an early planting season this year. Continue reading

Webinar: Southern Pine Beetle Biology, Ecology, and Management

You are invited to attend the latest Live Webinar sponsored by: Southern Regional Extension Forestry / Forest Health and Invasive Species Program

Title: Southern Pine Beetle Biology, Ecology, and Management

What will you learn? 
This webinar will cover basic biology, ecology, and management of the southern pine beetle (SPB). While the focus of the webinar will be the southeastern U.S., attention will be given to the recent encroachment of SPB into the northeastern states. learn more here… Continue reading

Webinar: Hemlock Woolly Adelgid Biology and Management in the Southeastern U.S.

Mar 29, 2017 1:00 pm US/Eastern

You are invited to attend the latest Live Webinar sponsored by: Southern Regional Extension Forestry / Forest Health and Invasive Species Program

Title: Hemlock Woolly Adelgid Biology and Management in the Southeastern U.S. Continue reading

Spotted Lanternfly national pest alert published

The spotted lanternfly is an invasive sap-feeding planthopper, first discovered in the United States in Berks County, Pennsylvania in 2014. Field observations indicate that the tree of heaven, Ailanthus altissima, is an important host plant; however the spotted lanternfly is known to feed on a wide range of hosts including wild and cultivated grapes, stone fruits, willow, and various hardwoods. This species is thought to be native to China, and has spread to other Asian countries. In 2004, it was first detected in Korea, where its populations expanded and it became an economically important pest of grapevines and fruit trees. In Korea, it damaged plants directly by phloem feeding, but also caused indirect damage due to mold that grew on honeydew excretions deposited on the leaves and fruits of host plants. It was recorded utilizing 67 host plant species in Korea, many of which also occur in the U.S. Given the wide range of hosts it feeds upon, the spotted lanternfly poses a serious economic threat to multiple U.S. industries, including viticulture, fruit trees, ornamentals and timber.

For the complete alert click on this link.

Fever ticks slipping across quarantine zone into Texas

in Southwest Farm Press

If you mention fever ticks to a Texas beef producer, chances are he knows what you’re talking about. But animal health activists say a reduction in outbreaks in recent years has made the risks posed by the ticks seem less dangerous and threatening.

But Texas Animal Health Commission Communications and Emergency Management Specialist Thomas Swafford warns that when it comes to fever ticks, not fully understanding the risks involved in an outbreak is a terrible mistake. Continue reading