Antkey Mobile, USDA ITP’s newest mobile app, is here!

The USDA APHIS ITP team is pleased to announce the latest addition to our mobile app collection: Antkey Mobile. Developed in cooperation with the tool’s author, Eli Sarnat, and Australia’s Identic team, this app is based on ITP’s web-based tool, Antkey .

Lucid Mobile apps offer you the identification keys you’ve come to rely on from the convenience of your smartphone or tablet. Antkey Mobile (free for Android or iOS) allows you to take your Lucid key with you into the field for surveys and screening, even if your field site lacks internet access. Continue reading

Crapemyrtle pest to be targeted by $3.3 million grant to Texas A&M AgriLife Extension

by Kathleen Phillips, Texas A&M AgriLife

The most popular flowering shrub in the U.S. has a new ally in a fight against a new, devastating exotic pest.

A $3.3 million grant will fund the study “Systematic Strategies to Manage Crapemyrtle Bark Scale” to be led by Dr. Mengmeng Gu, associate professor and ornamental horticulturist for Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service, College Station. Continue reading

Collaring the Mice that Carry Lyme Disease-Causing Ticks

White-footed mice in Howard County, Maryland are being collared as part of a study to improve control of the ticks that spread Lyme disease. The mouse collaring research, never before done in Maryland, is a partnership of the Agricultural Research Service (ARS), Howard County Department of Recreation & Parks (HCRP), and University of Maryland (UMD).

The mouse tracking is part of a larger five-year ARS Tick Management Project evaluating the use of minimal pesticide or integrated pest management methods to lower the number of black-legged ticks. Some of those ticks carry Lyme disease-causing bacteria and are around single-family yards and gardens adjacent to large Howard County parks. Continue reading

USFS Drought and invasive species webinar – September 14

The next US Forest Service drought webinar entitled “Drought and Invasive Species” is scheduled for Thursday September 14, 2017 from 2 to 3:30pm EST.  Directors Allen Rowley and Cindi West will provide opening remarks followed by several excellent speakers.

They anticipate a stimulating discussion with questions and answers. You may also earn continuing education credits if you are interested. Please call using conference line: 877-369-5243 and passcode: 0368706#.  To view the presentations, please connect using  http://climatewebinars.net/webinars/drought-invasives.  If you are in Washington, DC and would like to join in person, please come to the Civilian Conservation Corps room (PNW04) in the Yates building. Continue reading

Fall cankerworm biology, ecology, and management in urban and rural landscapes

The fall cankerworm, Alsophila pometaria, is a moth native to North America whose caterpillars are commonly called inchworms.  While this defoliator generally remains at low abundances, occasional outbreaks may occur.  Defoliation rarely hurts the tree, but may act as a stress agent if prolonged outbreaks occur.  This webinar will cover the biology and ecology of cankerworms, as well as management strategies.  Management in urban areas as well as in rural areas will be covered. Continue reading

Invasive plant species control in rangeland topic of Sept. 7 webinar

by Kay Ledbetter, Texas A&M AgriLife

Understanding and Controlling Invasive Species will be the title of the Sept. 7 natural resources webinar conducted by the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service ecosystem science and management unit.

The webinar is a part of the Texas Range Webinar Series scheduled the first Thursday of each month from noon to 1 p.m., said Pete Flores, AgriLife Extension webinar coordinator in Corpus Christi. Continue reading

From Research to Extension: 5 Things I Learned When I Changed My Science Career Path

by David Coyle, Ph.D., Southern Regional Extension Forestry

Dr. Coyle is a member of the Southern IPM Center Advisory Council. This post was originally on Entomology Today, but we wanted to share Dr. Coyle’s experience on our site as well.

A couple of years ago, I changed careers. No, I didn’t leave science altogether; rather, I switched from a research career (the “tenure-track” path, if you will) to a 100 percent extension job. Continue reading