APHIS Establishes a Host List for European Cherry Fruit Fly (Rhagoletis cerasi) and Conditions for Interstate Movement of Regulated Articles in Quarantined Areas

Effective immediately, the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) has developed a host list for European cherry fruit fly (ECFF, Rhagoletis cerasi), and established conditions for the interstate movement of regulated articles from core areas quarantined for ECFF. These conditions include a systems approach to allow the interstate movement of cherry fruit from areas in a half-mile radius of quarantine ECFF detections without methyl bromide fumigation.

This action is required because the current fruit fly host list in the domestic quarantine regulations for fruit flies in 7 CFR 301.32 does not include ECFF hosts. The list is needed to identify ECFF hosts and to prevent the spread of this pest within the United States. Previous APHIS actions related to ECFF did not specify conditions for interstate movement of ECFF hosts from a quarantined area. This action specifies that, with the exception described below, all host articles must be moved in accordance with the conditions for interstate movement of host articles in 7 CFR 301.32-4 and 301.32-5. Continue reading

New tick species discovered in North Carolina

Recent tick surveys sent to the US Department of Agriculture identified a longhorned tick on an opossum in Polk County, North Carolina. The longhorned tick is an exotic species from Asia that is a serious pest of livestock.

The tick was initially identified in New Jersey in 2017, but further research into other reported ticks that may have been misidentified have revealed that the first recorded case of this tick was on a white-tailed deer in August 2010 in West Virginia. Before its introduction in North Carolina, the tick had been positively identified in Arkansas, New Jersey, Virginia and West Virginia. Continue reading

Webinar: Biosecurity & Western Governors’ Association Invasive Species Initiative launch

Western Governors’ Association Chair and Hawaii Gov. David Ige will highlight the importance of invasive species management in the West and announce the locations of regional workshops as part of his Chairman’s Initiative during a webinar TODAY at 1:30 MT. Leaders in invasive species data management will also discuss WGA’s Invasive Species Data Management Protocol, a new effort to improve the interagency exchange of invasive species occurrence data in the West. Learn more and register now.

The webinar is TODAY at 1:30 Mountain time.

The webinar will be moderated by WGA Policy Advisor Bill Whitacre. Panelists include: Chuck Bargeron, Associate Director for Invasive Species and Information Technology, Center for Invasive Species & Ecosystem Health, University of Georgia; Pam Fuller, Program Leader, Nonindigenous Aquatic Species Database, USGS; Stinger Guala, Director of Biodiversity Information Serving Our Nation (BISON), USGS; Jamie Reaser, Executive Director, National Invasive Species Council; and Lori Scott, Interim President & CEO, and Chief Information Officer, NatureServe.

New Spotted Lanternfly Working Group meeting in July

Spotted lanternfly is a new invasive pest recently detected in southeastern Pennsylvania that feeds voraciously on many hosts, including grapes, hops, tree fruit, trees, and ornamentals.

The first Spotted Lanternfly Working Group meeting will be held July 16-17, 2018, at Albright College, Reading, PA. Continue reading

July 5 webinar to discuss invasive grasses in rangeland

by Kay Ledbetter, Texas A&M AgriLife

Invasive grasses will be the topic of a July 5 webinar by the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service ecosystem science and management unit.

“King Ranch and Kleberg Bluestem Management” is the next in the Texas Range Webinar Series, scheduled on the first Thursday of each month from noon to 1 p.m., said Pete Flores, webinar coordinator in Corpus Christi.

Dr. Megan Clayton, AgriLife Extension range specialist in Corpus Christi, will lead the webinar. Continue reading

Natural enemy suppresses kudzu bug population

By Julie Jernigan, University of Georgia

A tiny wasp — known as “Paratelenomus saccharalis” — is cutting down kudzu bug populations and Georgia soybean farmers’ need to treat for the pest, according to Michael Toews, a University of Georgia entomologist based on the UGA Tifton campus.

The wasp, an egg parasitoid and natural enemy of the kudzu bug, is saving soybean farmers time and money. Continue reading

Tree researchers gather in Lexington to share work in saving native trees

By Carol Lea Spence, University of Kentucky

Every day, American forests, both rural and urban, fight for their health against invasive species and pests. Scientists around the country are working diligently to protect and restore some iconic native species. Many of those scientific partners will gather in Lexington in mid-July to share their research findings.

The public also is welcome to come hear about their progress during a free, public seminar, Forests of the Future, 7 p.m. EDT July 11 at the Fayette County Extension office, 1140 Harry Sykes Way, Lexington. Continue reading