Webinar: Hemlock Woolly Adelgid Biology and Management in the Southeastern U.S.

Mar 29, 2017 1:00 pm US/Eastern

You are invited to attend the latest Live Webinar sponsored by: Southern Regional Extension Forestry / Forest Health and Invasive Species Program

Title: Hemlock Woolly Adelgid Biology and Management in the Southeastern U.S. Continue reading

Spotted Lanternfly national pest alert published

The spotted lanternfly is an invasive sap-feeding planthopper, first discovered in the United States in Berks County, Pennsylvania in 2014. Field observations indicate that the tree of heaven, Ailanthus altissima, is an important host plant; however the spotted lanternfly is known to feed on a wide range of hosts including wild and cultivated grapes, stone fruits, willow, and various hardwoods. This species is thought to be native to China, and has spread to other Asian countries. In 2004, it was first detected in Korea, where its populations expanded and it became an economically important pest of grapevines and fruit trees. In Korea, it damaged plants directly by phloem feeding, but also caused indirect damage due to mold that grew on honeydew excretions deposited on the leaves and fruits of host plants. It was recorded utilizing 67 host plant species in Korea, many of which also occur in the U.S. Given the wide range of hosts it feeds upon, the spotted lanternfly poses a serious economic threat to multiple U.S. industries, including viticulture, fruit trees, ornamentals and timber.

For the complete alert click on this link.

Fever ticks slipping across quarantine zone into Texas

in Southwest Farm Press

If you mention fever ticks to a Texas beef producer, chances are he knows what you’re talking about. But animal health activists say a reduction in outbreaks in recent years has made the risks posed by the ticks seem less dangerous and threatening.

But Texas Animal Health Commission Communications and Emergency Management Specialist Thomas Swafford warns that when it comes to fever ticks, not fully understanding the risks involved in an outbreak is a terrible mistake. Continue reading

USDA Scientists and Partners Investigate Hawaiian Tree Deaths

A team of U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) scientists and their collaborators are pursuing a fungal killer that’s attacking Hawaii’s native ‘Ōhi’a trees. Fortunately, their efforts are already turning up important new leads and tools to counter the fungus, known scientifically as Ceratocystis fimbriata.

Identified in 2014, C. fimbriata causes a vascular wilt disease called “Rapid ‘Ōhi’a Death” (ROD) that’s killed hundreds of thousands of ‘Ōhi’a trees in forest and residential areas. Affected areas include the Big Island of Hawaii’s South Hilo, Puna and Ka’ū districts, according to Lisa Keith, a plant pathologist with USDA’s Agricultural Research Service (ARS) in Hilo, Hawaii. Continue reading

Registration opens North American Invasive Species Forum, May 9-11

Registration is open! Registration is $200 and includes three lunches and two dinners. Early Registration and Hotel Block is available until March 31. Optional Field Trips are available on Thursday Afternoon, May 11 – Saturday, May 13. Space is limited for some trips.

About the Forum

North American Invasive Species Forum – Building Cooperation Across Borders

The North American Invasive Species Forum is a biennial conference encompassing the interests of professionals and organizations involved in invasive species management, research, and regulation in North America. Continue reading

Registration Open – North American Invasive Species Forum – May 9-11, 2017 – Savannah Georgia

Registration is open!   Registration is $200 and includes 3 lunches and 2 dinners.   Early Registration and Hotel Block is available until March 31, 2017.   Optional Field Trips are available on Thursday Afternoon, May 11 – Saturday, May 13.   Space is limited for some trips.

About the Forum

North American Invasive Species Forum – Building Cooperation Across Borders

http://www.invasivespecies2017.org Continue reading

Texas A&M institute helping find ‘key’ to preserving endangered Florida deer

by Paul Schattenberg and Steve Byrnes, Texas A&M AgriLife

For the past several months, a Texas A&M University System institute has been actively involved in efforts to quash a screwworm outbreak in Florida that has jeopardized an already endangered species, said the director for the Institute of Renewable Natural Resources.

“While there had been no screwworm outbreaks in the U.S. for the past 30 years, one began last July on Big Pine Key, which affected the Key deer population,” said Dr. Roel Lopez, institute director and co-principal investigator for the Key deer study, San Antonio. Continue reading