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  • Funded by USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture

    The Southern Region IPM Center is located at North Carolina State University, 1730 Varsity Drive, Suite 110, Raleigh, NC 27606, and is sponsored by the United States Department of Agriculture, National Institute of Food and Agriculture.
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Texas A&M leads $5.7 million research project to attack annual bluegrass

by Kay Ledbetter, Texas A&M AgriLife

The most widely grown irrigated crop in the U.S. – turfgrass – is being threatened by annual bluegrass, and Texas A&M AgriLife is leading a project to find solutions.

Texas A&M AgriLife is joining scientists across the nation to address the threat through a project called Research and Extension to Address Herbicide-Resistance Epidemic in Annual Bluegrass in Managed Turf Systems. Continue reading

IPM Enhancement Grant projects examine agricultural, urban issues

The Southern IPM Center will spend $309,653 to address agricultural and urban issues during the next year with its IPM Enhancement Grant. Out of 32 proposals submitted to the program, a review panel outside of the region selected 11 for funding.

IPM Enhancement Grants are relatively small grants (up to $30,000 for most) to address an integrated pest management issue. Most publicly funded organizations are eligible to apply as long as they reside in one of the 13 states or territories covered by the Southern IPM Center. Continue reading

Outcrossing between johnsongrass, sorghum studied

Dr. Muthu Bagavathiannan, Texas A&M AgriLife

Johnsongrass and sorghum might be considered “kissing kin,” but a Texas A&M AgriLife Research team wants to know if there is more going on in the grain sorghum production fields and bar ditches of South and Central Texas than meets the eye.

Dr. Muthu Bagavathiannan, weed scientist; Dr. Bill Rooney, sorghum breeder; and Dr. Patricia Klein, sorghum geneticist and molecular biologist, all with AgriLife Research in College Station, have teamed up to study gene flow between sorghum and johnsongrass. Continue reading

Predicting the behavior of invasive weeds

by Cambridge University Press

Is it possible to predict which nonnative plant species will become invasive weeds and when? According to research featured in the journal Invasive Plant Science and Management, the answer is “hopefully yes.” And those predictions can lead to more effective and cost-efficient weed management.

Researchers say invasive species generally follow a three-phase development curve – from lag to expansion to plateau. The length and rapidity of the expansion phase varies across species and determines how aggressively a plant spreads. Continue reading

Webinar: Privet Biology and Management in Southeastern Forests

You are invited to attend the latest Live Webinar sponsored by: Southern Regional Extension Forestry.

Title: Privet Biology and Management in Southeastern Forests

What will you learn?
 This webinar will cover privet biology, ecology, and management as it pertains to forests in the southeastern U.S. learn more here…

Presenters/Authors:

Dr. Nancy Loewenstein, Alabama Cooperative Extension System, Auburn University Continue reading

New National Pest Alert for Palmer Amaranth released

A new National Pest Alert for Palmer Amaranth has been released. This pest alert has been approved by the national leadership of USDA NRCS to address the recent problems with Palmer Amaranth seed inclusion in wildflower and pollinator seed mixes. Ultimately, decisions must be made at the local level to address the issue of Palmer amaranth in pollinator habitats, field edges and conservation plantings.

http://ncipmc.org/action/alerts/palmer.php

Floating rig battles invasive lake vegetation

In StarNews Online

by Terry Reilly

The lakes at Boiling Spring Lakes are not bubbling with scalding water. Instead of steam rising, the tentacles of invasive vegetation protrude from the city’s three main lakes.

The city launched a partial attack last year but retreated due to a lack of funds. Continue reading